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Friday, 18 April 2014

[BAA-ebulletin 00797] Radio Astronomy Group Meeting, National Space Centre, Leicester, May 17

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BAA electronic bulletin
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The BAA Radio Astronomy Group will be holding its 2014 General Meeting on Saturday 17th May at the National Space Centre, Leicester, LE4 5NS, starting at 10:30.  This year our keynote speakers will be Prof Paul Cannon OBE FREng (University of Birmingham)who will talk about Solar Superstorms, and Dr Klaas Wiersema (University of Leicester who will talk on Cosmic Explosions at Radio Wavelengths. This is a one-day event with a range of supporting papers covering aspects of amateur radio astronomy and geophysics.  A full list of the speakers,
 titles and synopses can be found at www.britastro.org/radio/

The last two RAG General Meetings have been very successful with tickets selling out before the day so prior booking is advised - a Booking Form is available from the BAA RAG website. Tickets are £15 (£12 for BAA members) and include tea/coffee, free admission to the NSC and free parking. For any other queries, please contact
me at radiogroup@britastro.org

Paul Hyde
BAA RAG Coordinator
======================================================================
BAA-ebulletin mailing list visit:
http://lists.britastro.org/mailman/listinfo/baa-ebulletin
(c) 2014 British Astronomical Association    http://www.britastro.org/
======================================================================
--
Good Clear Skies
--
Astrocomet
--
Colin James Watling
--
Various Voluntary work-Litter Picking for Parish Council (Daytime) and also a friend of Kessingland Beach (Watchman)
--
--
Real Astronomer and head of the Comet section for LYRA (Lowestoft and Great Yarmouth Regional Astronomers) also head of K.A.G (Kessingland Astronomy Group) and Navigator (Astrogator) of the Stars (Fieldwork)
--
Information

Thursday, 17 April 2014

Charts-info Astrosite Groningen (April 15, 2014)

Dear comet observers,    We have prepared the following new charts for our homepage:    C/2012 K1 (PANSTARRS):    - three 4.5x6.0 degrees charts for the period 17 April - 3 May 2014    C/2014 E2 (Jacques):    - three 4.5x6.0 degrees charts for the period 17 April - 2 May 2014      These new charts are now available in the charts section of our   mainpage at: http://www.shopplaza.nl/astro    Reinder Bouma/Edwin van Dijk  ----------------------------------------------------------------------------    ----------------------------------------------------------------------------

--
Good Clear Skies
--
Astrocomet
--
Colin James Watling
--
Various Voluntary work-Litter Picking for Parish Council (Daytime) and also a friend of Kessingland Beach (Watchman)
--
--
Real Astronomer and head of the Comet section for LYRA (Lowestoft and Great Yarmouth Regional Astronomers) also head of K.A.G (Kessingland Astronomy Group) and Navigator (Astrogator) of the Stars (Fieldwork)
--
Information

Monday, 14 April 2014

[BAA-ebulletin 00796] Final chance to book for the One day meeting in Milton Keynes

======================================================================
BAA electronic bulletin
======================================================================

We have extended the closing date until Thursday 17th April to give you
time to book for a very interesting day (not to be missed) The One Day
Meeting at The Open University, Berrill Lecture Theatre, Milton Keynes, MK7
6AA on Saturday April 26.

Do not hesitate sending your booking to the BAA office if you would like to
attend. Details can be found on the BAA website at http://britastro.org/
miltonkeynes2014


 The cost of this event is £15.00 to BAA members and £17.50 to non-members,
under 16's £5.00 (price includes refreshments and a Buffet Lunch). The day
starts at 10:30 with registration and finishes at 17:30.


 The programme is below :-

10:30  Registration - Tea / Coffee & time to visit our retailers

10:50  Official welcome - BAA President, Mrs Hazel McGee

11:00  Prof Andrew Norton -  "Gamma ray bursts - an astronomical detective
story"

12:00  Dr Cosimo Inserra - Supernovae: how to blow up a star!

13:00  Lunch & time to visit the observatory and our retailers

14:30  Sheridan Williams - The past, present, and future of the Open
University Astronomy Club

15:00  Dr Colin Forsyth - "Our volatile Sun: Explosions, Ejections and
Space Weather"

16:00  Tea & time to visit our retailers


16:30  Sheridan Williams - Solar eclipses (including the 2015 total eclipse)

17:30  Raffle & Close

Hazel Collett
Meetings Secretary
======================================================================
BAA-ebulletin mailing list visit:
http://lists.britastro.org/mailman/listinfo/baa-ebulletin
(c) 2014 British Astronomical Association    http://www.britastro.org/
======================================================================

--
Good Clear Skies
--
Astrocomet
--
Colin James Watling
--
Various Voluntary work-Litter Picking for Parish Council (Daytime) and also a friend of Kessingland Beach (Watchman)
--
Lyra Website: https://sites.google.com/site/lyrasociety/
--
Real Astronomer and head of the Comet section for LYRA (Lowestoft and Great Yarmouth Regional Astronomers) also head of K.A.G (Kessingland Astronomy Group) and Navigator (Astrogator) of the Stars (Fieldwork)
--
Information

Tuesday, 8 April 2014

Charts-info Astrosite Groningen (April 7, 2014)

Dear comet observers,    We have prepared the following new charts for our homepage:    C/2012 X1 (LINEAR):    - two 4.0x5.3 degrees charts for the period 6 - 27 April 2014    These new charts are now available in the charts section of our   mainpage at: http://www.shopplaza.nl/astro    Reinder Bouma/Edwin van Dijk  ----------------------------------------------------------------------------  ----------------------------------------------------------------------------

--
Good Clear Skies
--
Astrocomet
--
Colin James Watling
--
Various Voluntary work-Litter Picking for Parish Council (Daytime) and also a friend of Kessingland Beach (Watchman)
--
--
Real Astronomer and head of the Comet section for LYRA (Lowestoft and Great Yarmouth Regional Astronomers) also head of K.A.G (Kessingland Astronomy Group) and Navigator (Astrogator) of the Stars (Fieldwork)
--
Information

Monday, 7 April 2014

[BAA-ebulletin 00795] Re: Nova Cygni 2014 and Nova Scorpii 2014

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BAA electronic bulletin
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NOVA SCO 2014

Koichi Nishiyama and Fujio Kabashima, Japan, report their discovery of
a magnitude 10.1 nova in Scorpius using an unfiltered CCD and a
105-mm-f.l. f/4 camera lens on 2014 Mar. 26.8487 UT.  The coordinates
are: R.A. 17 15 46.83 Dec. -31 28 30.3 (2000.0).

NOVA CYG 2014

Koichi Nishiyama and Fujio Kabashima, Japan, further report their
discovery of a magnitude 10.9 nova in Cygnus using an unfiltered CCD
and a 105-mm-f.l. f/4 camera lens on 2014 Mar. 31.790 UT.
Coordinates: R.A. 20 21 42.32, Decl. +31 03 29.4 (2000.0).  Nothing is
visible at this position on their past survey frames taken on Mar.
27.781 (limiting mag 13.4) or on the Digitised Sky Survey, but it is
apparently visible at mag 12.4 on a pre-discovery image (limiting mag
13.5) taken on Mar. 30.769 UT.

Ulisse Munari, Istituto Nazionale di Astrofisica, Padova Astronomical
Observatory et. al., report that on Apr. 1.060 UT they obtained a
medium-resolution spectrogram which is that of a classical nova close
to maximum brightness and appreciably reddened.  On Apr. 1.099, they
obtained the following photometry for Nova Cyg 2014: B = 12.28, V =
11.32, R_c = 10.68, I_c = 10.03. The large B-V colour supports a
significant reddening affecting this nova.

Finder charts with comparison star sequences may be created using the
AAVSO Variable Star Plotter (VSP) at http://www.aavso.org/vsp.

Roger Pickard, Director BAAVSS
2014/04/05

======================================================================
BAA-ebulletin mailing list visit:
http://lists.britastro.org/mailman/listinfo/baa-ebulletin
(c) 2014 British Astronomical Association    http://www.britastro.org/
======================================================================

--
Good Clear Skies
--
Astrocomet
--
Colin James Watling
--
Various Voluntary work-Litter Picking for Parish Council (Daytime) and also a friend of Kessingland Beach (Watchman)
--
--
Real Astronomer and head of the Comet section for LYRA (Lowestoft and Great Yarmouth Regional Astronomers) also head of K.A.G (Kessingland Astronomy Group) and Navigator (Astrogator) of the Stars (Fieldwork)
--
Information

Wednesday, 2 April 2014

[BAA-ebulletin 00794] Reminder of next BAA meeting on 26th April 2014 in Milton Keynes

======================================================================
BAA electronic bulletin
======================================================================

I would like to remind you that the next meeting of the BAA will be the One
Day Meeting at The Open University, Berrill Lecture Theatre, Milton Keynes,
MK7 6AA on Saturday April 26.

 We do still have some places so if you are interested in coming please
send your booking to the BAA office no later than Monday April 14. Details
can be found on the BAA website at http://britastro.org/miltonkeynes2014

 The cost of this event is £15.00 to BAA members and £17.50 to non-members,
under 16's £5.00 (price includes refreshments and a Buffet Lunch). The day
starts at 10:30 with registration and finishes at 17:30.


 The programme is below :-

10:30  Registration - Tea / Coffee & time to visit our retailers

10:50  Official welcome - BAA President, Mrs Hazel McGee

11:00  Prof Andrew Norton -  "Gamma ray bursts - an astronomical detective
story"

12:00  Dr Cosimo Inserra - Supernovae: how to blow up a star!

13:00  Lunch & time to visit the observatory and our retailers

14:30  Sheridan Williams - The past, present, and future of the Open
University Astronomy Club

15:00  Dr Colin Forsyth - "Our volatile Sun: Explosions, Ejections and
Space Weather"

16:00  Tea & time to visit our retailers


16:30  Sheridan Williams - Solar eclipses (including the 2015 total eclipse)

17:30  Raffle & Close
======================================================================
BAA-ebulletin mailing list visit:
http://lists.britastro.org/mailman/listinfo/baa-ebulletin
(c) 2014 British Astronomical Association    http://www.britastro.org/
======================================================================
--
Good Clear Skies
--
Astrocomet
--
Colin James Watling
--
Various Voluntary work-Litter Picking for Parish Council (Daytime) and also a friend of Kessingland Beach (Watchman)
--
--
Real Astronomer and head of the Comet section for LYRA (Lowestoft and Great Yarmouth Regional Astronomers) also head of K.A.G (Kessingland Astronomy Group) and Navigator (Astrogator) of the Stars (Fieldwork)
--
Information

Tuesday, 1 April 2014

Military weather satellite finally set to launch / Shuttle mix-up revealed

 
NEWSALERT: Tuesday, April 1, 2014 @ 1230 GMT
------------------------------------------------------
The latest news from Spaceflight Now

 

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
Charity Gala Honors Hall of Fame Heroes
Celebrate the new class of U.S. Astronaut Hall of Fame Inductees at the Astronaut Scholarship Foundation’s 2014 Induction Gala, May 2 at the Kennedy Space Center Visitor Complex! Secure your tickets to this prestigious event online now at: http://astronautscholarship.org/programs-and-events/ahof-induction-weekend/
++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

 

A BLAST FROM THE PAST: MILITARY WEATHER SATELLITE FINALLY SET TO LAUNCH
-----------------------------------------------------------------------
A $518 million military weather satellite that has been waiting 15 years to shine will be launched into orbit Thursday atop an Atlas 5 rocket from the western spaceport in California.

http://spaceflightnow.com/atlas/av044/preview.html

 

NASA OFFICIALS TO DISCLOSE SPACE SHUTTLE ORBITER MIX-UP
-------------------------------------------------------
NASA will later today admit to an embarrassing paperwork error in the 1990s that led the agency to fly two of its space shuttle orbiters with the wrong names for almost two decades.

http://spaceflightnow.com/news/n1404/01shuttle/

 

FLORIDA LAUNCHES GROUNDED FOR UP TO THREE WEEKS
-----------------------------------------------
Rocket launches from Cape Canaveral are grounded until at least mid-April after an electrical short damaged an Air Force radar at the Kennedy Space Center, officials said Friday.

http://spaceflightnow.com/news/n1403/30range/

 

LONG MARCH ROCKET BOOSTS CHINESE SATELLITE TO ORBIT
---------------------------------------------------
China launched an experimental satellite Monday aboard a Long March 2C rocket from the Jiuquan space base in northwest China, according to official media reports.

http://spaceflightnow.com/news/n1403/31longmarch/

 

Soyuz crew arrives at the International Space Station
-----------------------------------------------------
A Russian Soyuz spacecraft carrying two cosmonauts and a NASA astronaut glided to a smooth linkup with the International Space Station Thursday, two days after a technical snag blocked a fast-track rendezvous and docking shortly after launch Tuesday.

http://spaceflightnow.com/station/exp39/140327docking/

 

GUIDE TO THE PLANETS FOR iPAD
-----------------------------
From tiny Mercury to distant Neptune and Pluto, this interactive guide to the planets from Astronomy Now magazine takes you on a tour of our Solar System and beyond.

https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/planets-astronomy-now-guide/id633956878?ls=1&mt=8

 

+++
SPACE STATION ASTRONAUT PATCHES
See our online store for the latest crew embroidered patches for the International Space Station. Free shipping to U.S. addresses. http://www.spaceflightnowstore.com/
+++



--
Good Clear Skies
--
Astrocomet
--
Colin James Watling
--
Various Voluntary work-Litter Picking for Parish Council (Daytime) and also a friend of Kessingland Beach (Watchman)
--
--
Real Astronomer and head of the Comet section for LYRA (Lowestoft and Great Yarmouth Regional Astronomers) also head of K.A.G (Kessingland Astronomy Group) and Navigator (Astrogator) of the Stars (Fieldwork)
--
Information

Monday, 31 March 2014

X-Flare Produces 'Magnetic Crochet'

Space Weather News for March 30, 2014
http://spaceweather.com

X-FLARE:  The magnetic canopy of sunspot AR2017 erupted yesterday, March 29th, producing an impulsive X1-class solar flare.  Ionizing radiation from the flare produced electrical currents in Earth's upper atmosphere and a ripple in Earth's magnetic field detected by magnetometers across the dayside of our planet.  Read more about this rare "magnetic crochet" and the possibility of more X-flares this weekend on today's edition of http://spaceweather.com.

SOLAR FLARE ALERTS:  Would you like a call the next time the sun erupts? X-flare alerts are available from http://spaceweathertext.com (text) and http://spaceweatherphone.com (voice).

--
Good Clear Skies
--
Astrocomet
--
Colin James Watling
--
Various Voluntary work-Litter Picking for Parish Council (Daytime) and also a friend of Kessingland Beach (Watchman)
--
--
Real Astronomer and head of the Comet section for LYRA (Lowestoft and Great Yarmouth Regional Astronomers) also head of K.A.G (Kessingland Astronomy Group) and Navigator (Astrogator) of the Stars (Fieldwork)
--
Information

Friday, 28 March 2014

Charts-info Astrosite Groningen (March 27, 2014)

Dear comet observers, We have prepared the following new charts for our homepage: C/2012 X1 (LINEAR): - a 4.5x6.0 degrees chart for the period 28 March - 6 April 2014 C/2013 R1 (Lovejoy): - a 3.0x4.0 degrees chart for the period 28 March - 8 April 2014
 
These new charts are now available in the charts section of our mainpage at:
 
http://www.shopplaza.nl/astro Reinder Bouma/Edwin van Dijk

--
Good Clear Skies
--
Astrocomet
--
Colin James Watling
--
Various Voluntary work-Litter Picking for Parish Council (Daytime) and also a friend of Kessingland Beach (Watchman)
--
--
Real Astronomer and head of the Comet section for LYRA (Lowestoft and Great Yarmouth Regional Astronomers) also head of K.A.G (Kessingland Astronomy Group) and Navigator (Astrogator) of the Stars (Fieldwork)
--
Information

Wednesday, 26 March 2014

Surprise! An Asteroid with Rings

Space Weather News for March 26, 2014
http://spaceweather.com

STRANGE BUT TRUE:  Astronomers peering into the outer solar system have found something surprising--an asteroid with rings.  The discovery has sparked a debate about how such a thing is possible and prompted a search for tiny moons threading through the asteroid's ring system. Get the full story from http://spaceweather.com

SOLAR FLARE ALERTS:  Would you like a call the next time the sun erupts? X-flare alerts are available from http://spaceweathertext.com (text) and http://spaceweatherphone.com (voice).

--
Good Clear Skies
--
Astrocomet
--
Colin James Watling
--
Various Voluntary work-Litter Picking for Parish Council (Daytime) and also a friend of Kessingland Beach (Watchman)
--
--
Real Astronomer and head of the Comet section for LYRA (Lowestoft and Great Yarmouth Regional Astronomers) also head of K.A.G (Kessingland Astronomy Group) and Navigator (Astrogator) of the Stars (Fieldwork)
--
Information

Monday, 24 March 2014

SPA ENB No. 372

                           
                  The SOCIETY for POPULAR ASTRONOMY
           Electronic News Bulletin No. 372   2014 March 23

Here is the latest round-up of news from the Society for Popular
Astronomy.  The SPA is Britain's liveliest astronomical society, with
members all over the world.  We accept subscription payments online
at our secure site and can take credit and debit cards.  You can join
or renew via a secure server or just see how much we have to offer by
visiting    http://www.popastro.com/
HUBBLE WITNESSES ASTEROID'S DISINTEGRATION
NASA
The Hubble telescope has observed the break-up of an asteroid into as
many as 10 pieces, something that has never been witnessed previously.
Fragile comets, composed of ice and dust, have been seen falling apart
as they approach the Sun, but nothing like that has been observed in
the asteroid belt.  The crumbling asteroid, designated P/2013 R3, was
first noticed as an unusual, fuzzy-looking object by the Catalina and
Pan-STARRS sky surveys on 2013 Sept. 15.  A follow-up observation on
October 1 at the Keck Observatory showed three bodies moving together
in an envelope of dust nearly the diameter of the Earth.  Hubble
observations showed the fragments drifting away from each other at a
leisurely 1 mph.  The asteroid began coming apart early last year, but
new pieces have continued to appear in the most recent images.  It is
unlikely that the asteroid is disintegrating because of a collision
with another one, which would have been instantaneous and violent by
comparison with what is observed.  Debris from a collision would also
be expected to travel much faster than observed.  Nor is the asteroid
coming unglued because of the pressure of interior ices warming and
vaporizing.
The most likely cause of the asteroid's disintegration is a subtle
effect of sunlight, which causes its rate of rotation gradually to
increase.  Gravity is very weak on an asteroid, whose whole structure
may not be solid but may consist of a lot of pieces loosely held
together by the weak gravity.  As it is slowly spun up by sunlight,
its component pieces succumb to centrifugal force and gently move
apart.  The possibility of disruption in that manner has been
discussed by scientists before, but never reliably observed.  If the
process has been correctly identified, P/2013 R3 must have a weak,
fractured interior -- probably as the result of non-destructive
collisions with other asteroids.  Most small asteroids are thought to
have been severely damaged in that way.  With the previous discovery
of an active asteroid, P/2013 P5, sporting six tails, astronomers are
finding more evidence that the action of sunlight may be the primary
cause of disintegration of small asteroids less than a mile across.
P/2013 R3's remnant debris, withe a probable mass of about 200,000
tons, will represent a rich source of meteoroids.  Most will
eventually plunge into the Sun, but a small fraction of the debris may
one day blaze across our skies as meteors.

WISE DOES NOT FIND 'PLANET X'
NASA/JPL
A survey made by the Wide-Field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) has
turned up no evidence of the existence of a hypothesized Solar-system
body sometimes dubbed 'Planet X'.  Pundits had theorized about the
existence of such a large but unseen celestial body somewhere beyond
the orbit of Pluto.  In addition to 'Planet X', the body had garnered
other nicknames, including 'Nemesis' and 'Tyche'.  The recent study,
which involved an examination of WISE data covering the entire sky in
infrared light, found that no object the size of Saturn or larger
exists out to a distance of 10,000 AU, and no object as large as
Jupiter exists out to 26,000 AU.  Speculation about the body has come
in part from geological studies that suggested a regular timing
associated with mass extinctions of forms of life on Earth.  The idea
was that a large planet or small star hidden in the farthest reaches
of the Solar System might periodically sweep through bands of outer
comets, sending some of them towards us.  The Planet-X-based mass-
extinction theories were largely ruled out even before the new WISE
study.  Other theories based on irregular comet orbits had also
postulated a Planet-X-type body.  The new WISE study now argues
against those theories as well.
But searches of the WISE catalogue have not all been negative.  A
second study, which concentrated on objects beyond the Solar System,
found 3,525 stars and brown dwarfs within 500 light-years of the Sun.
The WISE mission operated in 2010 and early 2011, and performed two
full scans of the sky, with a six-month gap between scans.  The survey
showed images of nearly 750 million celestial objects.  Astronomers
could compare the two full-sky surveys to look for moving objects.
In general, the more an object appears to have moved between the
scans, the closer it is likely to be.  Searches of the WISE catalogue
for moving objects are finding some of the closest stars.  The
discoveries include a star about 20 light-years away in the constell-
ation Norma, and (as reported last March) a pair of brown dwarfs only
6.5 light-years away -- the closest star system to be discovered for
nearly a century.

LARGEST YELLOW HYPERGIANT STAR OBSERVED
ESO
Astronomers using the Very Large Telescope Interferometer (VLTI) have
found that the yellow hypergiant star HR 5171 A is 1300 times the
diameter of the Sun, much bigger than was expected and making it the
largest yellow star known.  It is also in the top ten of the largest
stars known -- 50% larger than Betelgeuse and about a million times
brighter than the Sun.  The new observations also showed that the star
has a very close binary partner; the two stars are so close together
that they are touching.  Yellow hypergiants are very rare, with only a
dozen or so being known in our galaxy, the best-known example being
Rho Cassiopeiae.  They are at a stage in their evolution when they are
unstable and changing rapidly, and they expel material, forming a
large, extended atmosphere around the star.  Despite its great
distance of nearly 12000 light-years, HR 5171 can just about be seen
with the naked eye by the keen-sighted.
The team looked at previous observations of the star spanning more
than 60 years.  It has been getting bigger over the last 40 years,
cooling as it grows, and its evolution has been caught in action.
Only a few stars are caught in that very brief phase, where they
undergo a dramatic change in temperature as they rapidly evolve.
Photometric observations show the object to be an eclipsing binary
system, with a period of 1300 days.  The smaller companion has a
surface temperature slightly hotter than HR 5171 A's 5000°C.  The
companion is very significant, as it can have an influence on the
evolution of HR 5171 A, for example by stripping off its outer layers.

A LENS BIGGER THAN A GALAXY
NASA
Researchers have been observing a particularly distant patch of sky
where objects are brightened up by a 'lens' that is actually a massive
cluster of galaxies known as Abell 2744.  As predicted by Einstein's
theory of General Relativity, the mass of the cluster warps the fabric
of space around it.  Starlight passing by is deflected, somewhat as by
an ordinary lens.  Lately, the Hubble telescope, along with the
Spitzer space telescope and the Chandra X-ray observatory, has been
looking through the gravitational lens as part of a programme called
'Frontier Fields' which is an effort to explore the first billion
years of the Universe's history.  An international team looking at the
observations of Abell 2744 has discovered one of the most distant
galaxies ever seen -- a star system 30 times smaller yet 10 times more
active than the Milky Way.  Bursting with new-born stars, the object is
giving astronomers a rare glimpse of a galaxy born not long after the
Big Bang itself.  Overall, the Hubble exposure of Abell 2744 has
revealed almost 3,000 distant galaxies magnified and brightened as
much as 10 to 20 times.  Without the boost of gravitational lensing,
almost all of them would be invisible.  'Frontier Fields' is using six
clusters of galaxies as gravitational lenses.

GALAXIES IN EARLY UNIVERSE MATURE RAPIDLY
Swinburne University of Technology
An international team of researchers, including astronomers from
Swinburne University of Technology, has discovered the most distant
examples of galaxies in the early Universe that were already mature
and massive.  The mature galaxies were found at a distance of 12
billion light years, seen now as they were when their light started
out when the Universe was just 1.6 billion years old.  Astronomers
used deep images at near-infrared wavelengths to search for galaxies
with red colours in the early Universe (red colours indicate the
presence of old stars and a lack of active star formation).  Using
special filters to produce images in narrow slices of the near-
infrared spectrum, they were able to estimate distances to thousands
of distant galaxies at a time, providing a 3-D map of the early
Universe.  Surprisingly, they located 15 galaxies at an average
distance of 12 billion light years.  The galaxies are barely
detectable at visual wavelengths, but in near-infrared light they are
easily observed, from which it may be inferred that they already
contained as many as 100 billion stars on average per galaxy.  The
mature galaxies probably have masses similar to that of the Milky Way,
but had already finished star-formation when the Universe was only 12%
of its current age.  While the Milky Way still forms new stars at a
slow rate today, the galaxies referred to here must have formed in a
relatively 'short' time -- roughly one billion years -- with rates of
star-formation several hundred times higher than in the Milky Way
today.  This is the best evidence to date that some galaxies grew up
'quickly'.  The finding raises new questions about how the galaxies
formed so rapidly and why they stopped forming stars so early.
Bulletin compiled by Clive Down
(c) 2014 the Society for Popular Astronomy

               
--
Good Clear Skies
--
Astrocomet
--
Colin James Watling
--
Various Voluntary work-Litter Picking for Parish Council (Daytime) and also a friend of Kessingland Beach (Watchman)
--
--
Real Astronomer and head of the Comet section for LYRA (Lowestoft and Great Yarmouth Regional Astronomers) also head of K.A.G (Kessingland Astronomy Group) and Navigator (Astrogator) of the Stars (Fieldwork)
--
Information

Thursday, 20 March 2014

Mars....

http://www.astronomy.com/news/2014/03/nasa-orbiter-finds-new-gully-channel-on-mars

--
Good Clear Skies
--
Astrocomet
--
Colin James Watling
--
Various Voluntary work-Litter Picking for Parish Council (Daytime) and also a friend of Kessingland Beach (Watchman)
--
--
Real Astronomer and head of the Comet section for LYRA (Lowestoft and Great Yarmouth Regional Astronomers) also head of K.A.G (Kessingland Astronomy Group) and Navigator (Astrogator) of the Stars (Fieldwork)
--
Information

Monday, 17 March 2014

Stargazing Weekend 4th to 6th April 2014 in Somerset

Hello

 

We are holding a Stargazing weekend from the 4th to 6th April, and I was wondering if you would be able to pass this flyer on to your members or perhaps display it for us?

 

Please also see link to our homepage with more info!

 

http://www.staudriesbay.co.uk/files/12-2013/Stargazing-Weekend-April-2014-v2.pdf

 

Many thanks.

 

With kind regards

Alli

 

St Audries Bay Holiday Club
West Quantoxhead
Nr. Minehead
Somerset
TA4 4DY
Tel: 01984 632515

www.staudriesbay.co.uk

Please "Like" our Facebook page: www.facebook.com/staudriesbay

Follow us on Twitter: @StAudriesBay

 

--
Good Clear Skies
--
Astrocomet
--
Colin James Watling
--
Various Voluntary work-Litter Picking for Parish Council (Daytime) and also a friend of Kessingland Beach (Watchman)
--
--
Real Astronomer and head of the Comet section for LYRA (Lowestoft and Great Yarmouth Regional Astronomers) also head of K.A.G (Kessingland Astronomy Group) and Navigator (Astrogator) of the Stars (Fieldwork)
--
Information

[BAA-ebulletin 00791] Joint star party in Regent's Park with BSIA, this Thursday

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BAA electronic bulletin
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We will be holding a public observing session and star party this Thursday 20 March from 18:30 to 22:30 at The Hub, Regent’s Park, London NW1 4RU. This is the BAA’s and Baker Street Irregular Astronomers’ slightly delayed contribution to National Astronomy Week 2014: “Target Jupiter”.

If the weather is good we will be observing Jupiter in the west and Mars in the east, and since the Moon will be absent until the end of the event, we should get a chance to view some of the brighter deep-sky objects such as the Orion Nebula, clusters and double stars. It really is quite surprising what can be seen from the centre of London.

There will be a free raffle for all who attend, with a prize, donated jointly by the BAA and The Widescreen Centre, of a Celestron Nexstar 127 SLT telescope: a perfect starter telescope.

Bring telescopes or binoculars, or come and look through other peoples’. Further details, and a map of the location, are here.

The café will be open, serving food and drinks, until 22:00. There are toilets and the venue is disabled-accessable. From 21:00, access will be only from the illuminated path from the Monkey Gate on the Outer Circle, just west of the Zoo. Parking is free on the Outer Circle in the evening, and there is a bus, the 274 from Camden Town or Baker Street Stations. The correct stop is Wells Rise. The Hub is a five-minute walk from the Monkey Gate.

If the weather is forecast to be very poor 24 hours beforehand (as it is currently), the event will be shifted to the same time on Friday 21 March. The announcement will be made on the BSIA website, so check here, or the BSIA Twitter feed, @BakerStAstro, or the BAA Twitter feed, @BritAstro.

I hope to see some members along and to chat to you.

Clear skies,

David Arditti
Council Member
d@davidarditti.co.uk

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(c) 2014 British Astronomical Association    http://www.britastro.org/
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--
Good Clear Skies
--
Astrocomet
--
Colin James Watling
--
Various Voluntary work-Litter Picking for Parish Council (Daytime) and also a friend of Kessingland Beach (Watchman)
--
--
Real Astronomer and head of the Comet section for LYRA (Lowestoft and Great Yarmouth Regional Astronomers) also head of K.A.G (Kessingland Astronomy Group) and Navigator (Astrogator) of the Stars (Fieldwork)
--
Information

[BAA-ebulletin 00792] Regent's Park star party: corrections

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BAA electronic bulletin
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Apologies, a couple of corrections are necessary to my bulletin just issued on the event this Thursday (or Friday).

The details and map of the location are here:
http://www.astronomyweek.org.uk/?event=baabsia-star-party-at-regents-park

The raffle for the Nexstar 127 SLT telescope (value £469) will not be free (though attendance at the event will be). There will be a charge of £2 per ticket to raise money towards the cost of the Baker Street Irregular Astronomers putting on regular observing events at The Hub.

David Arditti
Council Member
d@davidarditti.co.uk



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BAA-ebulletin mailing list visit:
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(c) 2014 British Astronomical Association    http://www.britastro.org/
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--
Good Clear Skies
--
Astrocomet
--
Colin James Watling
--
Various Voluntary work-Litter Picking for Parish Council (Daytime) and also a friend of Kessingland Beach (Watchman)
--
--
Real Astronomer and head of the Comet section for LYRA (Lowestoft and Great Yarmouth Regional Astronomers) also head of K.A.G (Kessingland Astronomy Group) and Navigator (Astrogator) of the Stars (Fieldwork)
--
Information

[BAA-ebulletin 00793] Reminder of the next BAA meeting including the SGM

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BAA electronic bulletin
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I would like to remind you that the next meeting of the BAA will be on
Wednesday March 26 in the new lecture room, Burlington House.

17:30    Special General Meeting, at which the rates of subscription for
next year
             will be proposed and agreed.
17:40    Ordinary Meeting.  Mrs Hazel McGee, President
17:45    Dr Amelie Saintonge (UCL) -- "Gas and dust as probes of galaxy
evolution"
18:30    Nick James -- "Waking up Rosetta"
19:05    Sheridan Williams -- "The Geminid Meteors from Morocco"
19:25    David Arditti -- "Sky notes for the spring"
19:50    Close

Doors open at 17:00.  The meeting will start at 17:30 and is due to finish
by 20:00. Tea will be served in the library from 17:00.

Hope to see you there.

Hazel Collett
Meetings Secretary, British Astronomical Association
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BAA-ebulletin mailing list visit:
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(c) 2014 British Astronomical Association    http://www.britastro.org/
======================================================================
--
Good Clear Skies
--
Astrocomet
--
Colin James Watling
--
Various Voluntary work-Litter Picking for Parish Council (Daytime) and also a friend of Kessingland Beach (Watchman)
--
--
Real Astronomer and head of the Comet section for LYRA (Lowestoft and Great Yarmouth Regional Astronomers) also head of K.A.G (Kessingland Astronomy Group) and Navigator (Astrogator) of the Stars (Fieldwork)
--
Information

Tuesday, 11 March 2014

I spy... Rosetta's comet

I spy… Rosetta’s comet
10-03-2014 10:35 AM CET


Space science image of the week: Rosetta’s target comet, back in the field of view of ground-based telescopes, has brightened over the last four months

 

ESA logo
 

 


 
 
--
Good Clear Skies
--
Astrocomet
--
Colin James Watling
--
Various Voluntary work-Litter Picking for Parish Council (Daytime) and also a friend of Kessingland Beach (Watchman)
--
--
Real Astronomer and head of the Comet section for LYRA (Lowestoft and Great Yarmouth Regional Astronomers) also head of K.A.G (Kessingland Astronomy Group) and Navigator (Astrogator) of the Stars (Fieldwork)
--
Information

[BAA-ebulletin 00790] BAA Deep Sky Section meeting this Saturday - 15th March

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BAA electronic bulletin
======================================================================

2014 March 10

The 2014 meeting of the Deep Sky Section is nearly upon us, so this is just
a final reminder that all are welcome to attend.

It is taking place at The Deco in Northampton.

Doors will open at 9:45, and after a review of the year, there is a diverse
and interesting programme of talks:

Dale Holt - "Using a deep sky video camera to observe the Hickson Compact
Galaxy groups",
Stewart Moore - "Great Balls of Fire - The Glory of Globulars"
Section observing programmes - Callum Potter, Paul Curtis, & Grant Privett
Grant Privett - "Digging in the Dirt: Adventures with image noise"
Ian Sharp - “Remote imaging the deep sky”
Prof. Albert Zijlstra (University of Manchester) - “Latest developments in
planetary nebulae research”

Traders at the meeting are: Astronomia. BAA Sales, and the Webb Deep-Sky
Society. I hope you will support our traders, and if you would like to view
or purchase anything specific from Astronomia please contact
adele@astronomia.co.uk directly.

If you are planning to attend, it would be appreciated if you could let me
know (for catering requirements) - email deepsky@britastro.org
If you have already let me know, you should have had a reply, and not need
to contact me again.

Full details available at:
http://britastro.org/meeting_render/3533

Clear skies.

Callum

Callum Potter
Director, Deep Sky Section
British Astronomical Association
deepsky@britastro.org
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BAA-ebulletin mailing list visit:
http://lists.britastro.org/mailman/listinfo/baa-ebulletin
(c) 2014 British Astronomical Association    http://www.britastro.org/
======================================================================

--
Good Clear Skies
--
Astrocomet
--
Colin James Watling
--
Various Voluntary work-Litter Picking for Parish Council (Daytime) and also a friend of Kessingland Beach (Watchman)
--
--
Real Astronomer and head of the Comet section for LYRA (Lowestoft and Great Yarmouth Regional Astronomers) also head of K.A.G (Kessingland Astronomy Group) and Navigator (Astrogator) of the Stars (Fieldwork)
--
Information

Monday, 10 March 2014

SPA ENB No. 371

             The SOCIETY for POPULAR ASTRONOMY

          Electronic News Bulletin No. 371  2014 March 9


Here is the latest round-up of news from the Society for Popular
Astronomy.  The SPA is Britain's liveliest astronomical society, with
members all over the world.  We accept subscription payments online
at our secure site and can take credit and debit cards.  You can join
or renew via a secure server or just see how much we have to offer by
visiting    http://www.popastro.com/

 

LUNAR IMPACT OBSERVED
RAS

A meteorite with the mass of a small car crashed into the Moon last
September, according to Spanish astronomers. The impact, the biggest
seen to date, produced a bright flash and would have been easy to
detect from the Earth.  The Earth's atmosphere prevents small rocks
from space from reaching the surface, and geological activity and
weathering processes tend in time to efface the evidence of even major
impacts.  The Moon has no such atmosphere, and the record of the
collisions that span the 4.5 billion years' history of the Solar
System is plain to see on its surface, in the form of the vast numbers
of craters large and small that cover it.  Although there is little
likelihood now of a very large object striking the Moon or planets,
collisions with smaller objects are very common even today.  The odds
of seeing one of them by chance are very poor, so scientists have set
up networks of telescopes that can detect them automatically.

On 2013 September 11, Prof. Jose M. Madiedo was operating two such
telescopes in the south of Spain.  At 2007 UT he witnessed an
unusually long and bright flash in Mare Nubium, one of the ancient
lava-filled 'seas' of the Moon.  The flash occurred in the
un-illuminated part of the Moon's disc (it was shortly before First
Quarter) and might well have been visible to anyone who happened to be
looking at the Moon at that moment.  It was no doubt the result of a
rock crashing into the lunar surface and was briefly almost as bright
as the Pole Star.  In the video recording made by Prof. Madiedo, an
afterglow remained visible for a further eight seconds.  The event is
the longest and brightest confirmed impact flash ever observed on the
Moon.  It was probably produced by an impactor whose size was of the
order of a metre, and created a new crater with a diameter of around
40 metres.  The impact energy was equivalent to an explosion of
roughly 15 tons of TNT, at least three times higher than the largest
previously seen event observed in March last year.


PLANETS ORBITING 'NEARBY' RED-DWARF STARS
RAS

A group of astronomers from the UK and Chile reports the discovery of
eight small planets orbiting 'nearby' red-dwarf stars.  By way of a
rashly extreme extrapolation from that small sample, the scientists
estimate that a large fraction of red dwarfs, which make up at least
three-quarters of the stars in the Universe (or at least in our
Galaxy -- they are too faint to see in other galaxies) has associated
low-mass planets.  The researchers found the planets by analysing
archival data from two high-precision planet surveys made with the
Ultraviolet and Visual Echelle Spectrograph (UVES) and High-Accuracy
Radial-velocity Planet Searcher (HARPS), both operated by the European
Southern Observatory in Chile.  The two instruments are used to
measure how much a star is affected by the gravity of a planet in
orbit around it.  As an unseen planet orbits a distant star, the star
itself moves (though in a much smaller orbit than the planet) around
their common centre of gravity.  A small periodic variation in the
radial velocity of the star demonstrates the existence of the planet
that is causing it.  By combining the data from UVES and HARPS, the
team reckoned to be able to detect signals that were not strong enough
to be seen in the data from either instrument alone.

The astronomers thereby considered that they had discovered the eight
planets, three of which are in the so-called 'habitable zones' (which
merely means that the temperatures there are usually between freezing
and boiling) of their respective stars and are only a little more
massive than the Earth.  All the newly discovered planets orbit
red-dwarf stars between 15 and 80 light years away.  They take between
two weeks and nine years to complete each orbit, placing them at
distances from their stars of between 6 and 600 million km (equivalent
to between 0.04 and 4 times the distance from the Earth to the Sun).
The team used novel (cynics might say dodgy) analysis techniques to
squeeze the planetary signals out of the data, which did not
obviously exhibit them.  The discoveries add eight new exo-planet
signals to the previous total of 17 already known around such low-mass
stars.  The team also plans to follow up a further ten even weaker
signals.


A BREAKTHROUGH IN PLANET DISCOVERIES
NASA

The Kepler team has now discovered 715 new planets.  Kepler works by
looking for the slight dimming of starlight caused when a distant
planet transits its parent star.  Any dip in stellar brightness
attracts the attention of the Kepler team, and can prompt it to
declare a planet candidate.  Verification of candidates can be a
laborious process, proceeding slowly, planet by planet.  Now, however,
researchers have thought up a way to cut corners on the procedure by a
technique they call 'verification by multiplicity'; it relies in part
on the logic of probability, which a cynic might think less trust-
worthy than actual evidence of the planets.  Out of the 160,000 stars
Kepler has observed, a few thousand have planet candidates.  But not
all candidate systems are equal.  A subset of the total, numbering in
the hundreds, has not just one but multiple candidates.  By
concentrating on those systems, the team found 715 planets orbiting
305 stars.  All of the newly-discovered ones are located in
multi-planet systems.  Nearly 95% of the planets are smaller than
Neptune, that is, less than four times the size of the Earth.  That is
a marked increase in the known number of relatively small planets.
The study suggests that planets in multi-systems tend to be small and
their orbits tend to be circular, much like the inner part of our own
Solar System.  Four of the new planets are less than 2.5 times the
diameter of the Earth.


CLOUDS SEEN CIRCLING SUPERMASSIVE BLACK HOLES
RAS

Astronomers see clouds of gas orbiting supermassive black holes at the
centres of galaxies.  Once thought to be in relatively uniform,
fog-like rings, the accreting matter is now thought instead to form
clumps dense enough intermittently to dim the intense radiation
blazing from the vicinities of the holes.  Evidence for the clouds
comes from records collected over 16 years by the Rossi X-ray Timing
Explorer, a satellite in low Earth orbit equipped with instruments
that measure variations in X-ray sources.  Those sources include
active galactic nuclei, brilliantly luminous objects powered by
supermassive black holes as they gather and condense huge quantities
of dust and gas.

From records for 55 active galactic nuclei, astronomers found a dozen
instances where the X-ray signal dimmed for periods of time ranging
from hours to years, presumably when a cloud of dense gas passed
between the source and satellite.  The clouds they observed orbit a
few light-weeks to a few light-years from the centres of the nuclei.


FOUR NEW GALAXY CLUSTERS FURTHER BACK IN TIME
RAS

Four very distant galaxy clusters, each potentially containing
thousands of individual galaxies, have newly been discovered.
Astronomers used a new way of combining data from two ESA satellites,
Planck and Herschel, to identify more distant galaxy clusters than has
previously been possible.  The researchers believe up to 2000 further
clusters could be identified using that technique, helping to build a
more detailed time-line of how clusters are formed.  Galaxy clusters
are the most massive objects in the Universe, containing hundreds to
thousands of galaxies, bound together by gravity.  While astronomers
have identified many nearby clusters, they need to go further back in
time to understand how such structures are formed.  The light from the
most distant of the four new clusters identified by the team has taken
over 10 billion years to reach us, so the researchers are seeing what
the cluster looked like when the Universe was 'only' three billion
years old.

Although we are able to see individual galaxies that go further back
in time, up to now the most distant clusters found by astronomers date
back to when the universe was 4.5 billion years old.  Clusters can be
identified at such distances because they contain galaxies in which
huge amounts of dust and gas are being formed into stars.  Galaxies
are divided into two types: elliptical galaxies that have many stars,
but little dust and gas; and spiral galaxies like our own, which
contain lots of dust and gas.  Most clusters today are dominated by
giant elliptical galaxies in which the dust and gas has already been
formed into stars.  It is thought that what we are seeing in the
distant clusters are giant elliptical galaxies in the process of being
formed.

Observations were recorded by the Spectral and Photometric Imaging
Receiver (SPIRE) instrument as part of the Herschel Multi-tiered
Extragalactic Survey (HerMES).  The researchers are among the first to
combine data from two satellites both of which ended their operations
last year: Planck, which scanned the whole sky, and Herschel, which
surveyed certain sections in greater detail.  The researchers used
Planck data to find sources of far-infrared emission in areas covered
by the Herschel satellite, then cross-referenced with Herschel data to
look at those sources more closely.  Of sixteen sources identified by
the researchers, most were confirmed as single, nearby galaxies that
were already known.  However, four were shown by Herschel to be formed
of multiple, fainter sources, indicating previously unknown galaxy
clusters.  The team then used additional existing data and new
observations to estimate the distances of those clusters and to
determine which of the galaxies within them were forming stars.  The
researchers are now hoping to identify more clusters by that
technique, with the aim of looking further back in time to the
earliest stage of cluster formation.


FIRST LIGHT FOR MUSE
ESO

A new instrument called MUSE (Multi Unit Spectroscopic Explorer) has
been installed on ESO's Very Large Telescope (VLT) at the Paranal
Observatory in northern Chile.  MUSE's scientific goals include
looking at the mechanisms of galaxy formation in the early Universe,
and studying both the motions of material in nearby galaxies and their
chemical properties, but it will be able to do other things as well.
MUSE uses 24 spectrographs to create both images and spectra of
selected regions of the sky.  It creates 3D views of the Universe with
a spectrum for each pixel as the third dimension.  In the subsequent
analysis the astronomer can move through the data and study different
views of the object at different wavelengths.


SPA SOLAR SECTION 2014 JANUARY
By Geoff Elston, SPA Solar Section Director

There were some high levels of sunspot activity, particularly
mid-month, and there was one naked-eye sunspot in early January that
reappeared at the end of the month.  The continued stormy weather
across much of the UK in January did not help our observations, but we
only lost 3 days to poor weather thanks to the dedication of our
observers.

Rotation Nos. 2145 & 2146:  The Mean Daily Frequency rose very
slightly to 5.97 in January and the Relative Sunspot Number increased
to 81.98.

WHITE-LIGHT ACTIVITY: January started with Active Region (AR) 1936, a
complex cluster of medium- and small-sized sunspots, having reached
the Central Meridian (CM) by end-December, heading towards the West
(W) limb.  The group was reported as flare-active but it did not
produce any significant geomagnetic storms.  That group was swiftly
followed (and somewhat overshadowed) by the appearance of AR 1944.
That too was flare-active and appeared over the East (E) limb on the
first day of the New Year.  I was alerted on the 3rd that AR 1944 was
visible with the (suitably protected) naked eye.  Its visibility was
due to the structure of the main spot, which had a big dark umbra
within a fairly large round penumbra. The group was seen with the
naked eye until about the 11th, by which time it was nearing the W
limb. On that day AR 1944 showed fragmented penumbrae and numerous
umbrae. The main spot was almost oval except for two small extensions,
and the following parts of the group included a fairly intact sunspot
with a trail of penumbrae and umbrae with some pores.  Little did we
know as AR 1944 went over the W limb on the 14th there was more to come
from that sunspot group!

From the 14th onwards there was a number of medium- and small-sized
spots across the solar disc.  AR 1949 and 1953 were by then over the
CM.  AR 1949 showed two spots close together with fairly prominent
umbrae.  AR 1953 was a cluster of smaller spots in which 9 umbrae were
counted.  Although fairly spotted, the Sun was quiet, but there was a
number of small spots near the SE limb; the largest, AR 1960, showed a
horseshoe-shaped umbra.  By the 20th the Sun was still quite spotted
and AR 1960 was much the same but AR 1959 to the south had developed
and was showing a trail of smaller spots behind the main leader.  Both
AR 1959 and AR 1960 had reached the CM by the 25th.

The 27th saw the return of AR 1944 at the E limb, re-designated AR
1967 and was immediately said to be highly flare-active.  As it moved
away from the limb in late January to early February it was clearly
seen with the protected naked eye, and through the telescope with a
solar filter the whole group showed a lot of detailed structure.
Spaceweather.com website (www.spaceweather.com) reported that a strong
M-class flare had produced a Coronal Mass Ejection (CME) on the 30th.
Just north of AR 1967 was another complex train of smaller sunspots,
AR 1968, a group that would have been impressive on its own if it were
not right next to AR 1967.

H-ALPHA ACTIVITY

In line with sunspot activity, H-alpha activity also increased.  There
were numerous prominences around the limb on the 2nd.  Most were small
low-lying spikes but there was also a couple of tall spikes and an
ejected prominence near the N limb.  On the disc there were some
bright plages visible around sunspot groups 1936 and 1944 and some
dark filaments.  The 8th saw some more substantial prominences,
particularly on the NE limb, and a bright and active prominence on the
NW limb. There were plages around all the many sunspots visible (the
most prominent were around 1944). There were also several dark
filaments, especially a large bowed filament on the southern
hemisphere.  The 9th saw many prominences, mainly along the E limb.
Across the disc was a mixture of bright plages and dark filaments!
The high level of activity continued, and by the 11th, as 1944 was
nearing the W limb, there were several complex and beautiful
prominences on the SE and NW and W limbs.  There were many bright
plages, largely clustered around sunspot groups 1944, 1948 and 1949,
and dark filaments lying further away on the solar disc.  Two disc
drawings received show that activity very well.  The 13th and 14th saw
prominence activity still at a high level, with some ejected
prominences on the E limb and NW limb.  Another image shows the
ejected prominence on the NW limb on the 14th.  Prominence activity as
well as plage and filament activity was mostly confined to the
southern hemisphere by the 16th.  A fine group of intricate arch-type
prominences was seen along the SE limb, and plages were seen near
sunspots 1949 and 1955 as well as a fairly extensive dusky broad
filament nearing the SW limb.  On the 23rd the SE and W limbs showed
some detailed prominence activity, and on the disc plage and filament
activity was seen either around or nearby 1955, 1957, and 1959 (which
also had a long dark filament nearby).  Sunspots 1960, 1963 and 1965
had plage and filament activity among them.

MDF (P): 7.82

Bulletin compiled by Clive Down

(c) 2014 the Society for Popular Astronomy
 


Society for Popular Astronomy | 36 Fairway, Keyworth
This email was sent to astrocomera@googlemail.com
--
Good Clear Skies
--
Astrocomet
--
Colin James Watling
--
Various Voluntary work-Litter Picking for Parish Council (Daytime) and also a friend of Kessingland Beach (Watchman)
--
--
Real Astronomer and head of the Comet section for LYRA (Lowestoft and Great Yarmouth Regional Astronomers) also head of K.A.G (Kessingland Astronomy Group) and Navigator (Astrogator) of the Stars (Fieldwork)
--
Information

Thursday, 6 March 2014

Charts-info Astrosite Groningen (March 5, 2014)

Dear comet observers,    We have prepared the following new chart for our homepage:    C/2013 R1 (Lovejoy):    - a 3.0x4.0 degrees chart for the period 6 - 18 March 2014    This new chart is now available in the charts section of our   mainpage at: http://www.shopplaza.nl/astro    Reinder Bouma/Edwin van Dijk  ----------------------------------------------------------------------------    ----------------------------------------------------------------------------

--
Good Clear Skies
--
Astrocomet
--
Colin James Watling
--
Various Voluntary work-Litter Picking for Parish Council (Daytime) and also a friend of Kessingland Beach (Watchman)
--
--
Real Astronomer and head of the Comet section for LYRA (Lowestoft and Great Yarmouth Regional Astronomers) also head of K.A.G (Kessingland Astronomy Group) and Navigator (Astrogator) of the Stars (Fieldwork)
--
Information

Asteroid to sweep within moon's distance on Wednesday

Watch online as asteroid 2014 DX110 sweeps closer than the moon on Wednesday, March 5.
 
Good Clear Skies
--
Astrocomet
--
Colin James Watling
--
Various Voluntary work-Litter Picking for Parish Council (Daytime) and also a friend of Kessingland Beach (Watchman)
--
--
Real Astronomer and head of the Comet section for LYRA (Lowestoft and Great Yarmouth Regional Astronomers) also head of K.A.G (Kessingland Astronomy Group) and Navigator (Astrogator) of the Stars (Fieldwork)
--
Information

Monday, 3 March 2014

Venus And The Moon....

http://earthsky.org/todays-image/best-photos-of-moon-and-venus-conjunction-february-26-2014?utm_source=EarthSky+News&utm_campaign=1d5542672b-EarthSky_News&utm_medium=email&utm_term=0_c643945d79-1d5542672b-393732205

--
Good Clear Skies
--
Astrocomet
--
Colin James Watling
--
Various Voluntary work-Litter Picking for Parish Council (Daytime) and also a friend of Kessingland Beach (Watchman)
--
--
Real Astronomer and head of the Comet section for LYRA (Lowestoft and Great Yarmouth Regional Astronomers) also head of K.A.G (Kessingland Astronomy Group) and Navigator (Astrogator) of the Stars (Fieldwork)
--
Information

Saturday, 1 March 2014

Kepler confirms a whopping 715 new planets

http://earthsky.org/space/kepler-confirms-a-whopping-715-new-planets?utm_source=EarthSky+News&utm_campaign=76ee9dcc5c-EarthSky_News&utm_medium=email&utm_term=0_c643945d79-76ee9dcc5c-393732205

--
Good Clear Skies
--
Astrocomet
--
Colin James Watling
--
Various Voluntary work-Litter Picking for Parish Council (Daytime) and also a friend of Kessingland Beach (Watchman)
--
--
Real Astronomer and head of the Comet section for LYRA (Lowestoft and Great Yarmouth Regional Astronomers) also head of K.A.G (Kessingland Astronomy Group) and Navigator (Astrogator) of the Stars (Fieldwork)
--
Information

Friday, 28 February 2014

SPA Newsletter - aurora alert

Auroral activity is being reported tonight across much of the UK and Europe, after the impact of a Coronal Mass Ejection from the Sun delivered a glancing blow to the Earth in the late afternoon. The BBC reports that displays have been seen as far south as Essex. http://popastro.us5.list-manage1.com/track/click?u=c3c026b652ea9c4b1c85afb31&id=6e6f7701a3&e=65c669f6a5

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Good Clear Skies
--
Astrocomet
--
Colin James Watling
--
Various Voluntary work-Litter Picking for Parish Council (Daytime) and also a friend of Kessingland Beach (Watchman)
--
--
Real Astronomer and head of the Comet section for LYRA (Lowestoft and Great Yarmouth Regional Astronomers) also head of K.A.G (Kessingland Astronomy Group) and Navigator (Astrogator) of the Stars (Fieldwork)
--
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Thursday, 27 February 2014

CME Impact and Geomagnetic Storm

Space Weather News for Feb. 27, 2014
http://spaceweather.com

CME IMPACT: As expected, a CME hit Earth's magnetic field today (Feb. 27th @ 1645 UT), and the impact has triggered geomagnetic storms around Earth's poles.  The CME is an after-effect of the X4.9 class solar flare reported on Feb. 25th.  Visit http://spaceweather.com for updates about this developing space weather event.

AURORA ALERTS:  Would you like a call when geomagnetic storms are underway? Aurora alerts are available from http://spaceweathertext.com (text) and http://spaceweatherphone.com (voice).

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Good Clear Skies
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Astrocomet
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Colin James Watling
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Various Voluntary work-Litter Picking for Parish Council (Daytime) and also a friend of Kessingland Beach (Watchman)
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Real Astronomer and head of the Comet section for LYRA (Lowestoft and Great Yarmouth Regional Astronomers) also head of K.A.G (Kessingland Astronomy Group) and Navigator (Astrogator) of the Stars (Fieldwork)
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