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Tuesday, 31 December 2013

Must-See Sunset Phenomenon

Space Weather News for Dec. 30, 2013
http://spaceweather.com

MUST-SEE SUNSET PHENOMENON: Like the Moon, Venus has phases, and this week the second planet from the sun is a whisper-thin crescent. The phenomenon is easy to observe. Venus is so bright, you can see it at sunset even before the sky fades to black (hint: face southwest).  A pair of binoculars or a small telescope reveals Venus's crescent shape. Check http://spaceweather.com for photos and more information.

AURORA WATCH:  A solar wind stream is approaching Earth and could spark the first auroras of 2014 when it arrives on Jan. 2-4.  Would you like a call when the sky lights up? Geomagnetic storm alerts are available from http://spaceweathertext.com (text) and http://spaceweatherphone.com (voice).


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Good Clear Skies
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Astrocomet
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Colin James Watling
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Various Voluntary work-Litter Picking for Parish Council (Daytime) and also a friend of Kessingland Beach (Watchman)
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Real Astronomer and head of the Comet section for LYRA (Lowestoft and Great Yarmouth Regional Astronomers) also head of K.A.G (Kessingland Astronomy Group) and Navigator (Astrogator) of the Stars (Fieldwork)
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Information

Tuesday, 24 December 2013

Charts-info Astrosite Geoningen (December 24, 2013)

We have prepared the following new chart for our homepage:    C/2013 R1 (Lovejoy):    - a 9x12 degrees chart for the period 25 December 2013 - 12 January 2014    This new chart is now available in the charts section of our   mainpage at: http://www.shopplaza.nl/astro    We wish you all a Merry Christmas and a bright 2014.    Reinder Bouma/Edwin van Dijk  ----------------------------------------------------------------------------  You are currently subscribed to the charts-info of Astrosite Groningen.  You can (un)subscribe to this service by sending an email to comets@home.nl  with in the body: (un)subscribe charts-info <your email address>.  ----------------------------------------------------------------------------



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Good Clear Skies
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Astrocomet
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Colin James Watling
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Various Voluntary work-Litter Picking for Parish Council (Daytime) and also a friend of Kessingland Beach (Watchman)
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Real Astronomer and head of the Comet section for LYRA (Lowestoft and Great Yarmouth Regional Astronomers) also head of K.A.G (Kessingland Astronomy Group) and Navigator (Astrogator) of the Stars (Fieldwork)
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Information

Rare Christmas Conjunction Observed from Space

Something Interesting....
 
 
Space Weather News for Dec. 24, 2013
http://spaceweather.com

CHRISTMAS CONJUNCTION: Stationed over the far side of the sun, NASA's STEREO-B probe is observing a rare conjunction of planets.  Venus, Jupiter, and Earth  are aligning to produce a "Christmas Star" for the distant spacecraft.  Visit http://spaceweather.com for images.

LAST MINUTE GIFT IDEA: Would you like to give someone a solar flare for Christmas? There's still time. Gift subscriptions to our Space Weather Alert Service are available now. Sign up for text (http://spaceweathertext.com) or voice (http://spaceweatherphone.com).


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Good Clear Skies
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Astrocomet
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Colin James Watling
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Various Voluntary work-Litter Picking for Parish Council (Daytime) and also a friend of Kessingland Beach (Watchman)
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--
Real Astronomer and head of the Comet section for LYRA (Lowestoft and Great Yarmouth Regional Astronomers) also head of K.A.G (Kessingland Astronomy Group) and Navigator (Astrogator) of the Stars (Fieldwork)
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Information

Monday, 23 December 2013

Comet Lovejoy-still on view for early risers....

Saturday, 21 December 2013

The Winter Solstice....

The Winter Solstice arrive @ 17.11 hours U.T (Just after the football final whistle)
 
 
 
Good Clear Skies
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Astrocomet
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Colin James Watling
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Various Voluntary work-Litter Picking for Parish Council (Daytime) and also a friend of Kessingland Beach (Watchman)
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--
Real Astronomer and head of the Comet section for LYRA (Lowestoft and Great Yarmouth Regional Astronomers) also head of K.A.G (Kessingland Astronomy Group) and Navigator (Astrogator) of the Stars (Fieldwork)
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Information

Friday, 13 December 2013

Comet Lovejoy...

http://www.popastro.com/

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Good Clear Skies
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Astrocomet
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Colin James Watling
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Various Voluntary work-Litter Picking for Parish Council (Daytime) and also a friend of Kessingland Beach (Watchman)
--
--
Real Astronomer and head of the Comet section for LYRA (Lowestoft and Great Yarmouth Regional Astronomers) also head of K.A.G (Kessingland Astronomy Group) and Navigator (Astrogator) of the Stars (Fieldwork)
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Information

Thursday, 12 December 2013

The Geminid Meteor Shower is Underway

Space Weather News for Dec. 12, 2013
http://spaceweather.com

GEMINID METEOR SHOWER:  Earth is entering a stream of debris from "rock comet" 3200 Phaethon, source of the annual Geminid meteor shower.  Last night, NASA cameras recorded more than a dozen fireballs over the USA.  Geminid activity should remain relatively high for the next three or four nights, with a peak expected on Dec. 13-14.  Check http://spaceweather.com for more information and observing tips.

GEOMAGNETIC STORM:  On Dec. 7th, a solar wind stream hit Earth's magnetic field, sparking an unexpected geomagnetic storm and Northern Lights over several US states. Did you miss it?  Auroras alerts are available from http://spaceweathertext.com (text) and http://spaceweatherphone.com (voice).


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Good Clear Skies
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Astrocomet
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Colin James Watling
--
Various Voluntary work-Litter Picking for Parish Council (Daytime) and also a friend of Kessingland Beach (Watchman)
--
--
Real Astronomer and head of the Comet section for LYRA (Lowestoft and Great Yarmouth Regional Astronomers) also head of K.A.G (Kessingland Astronomy Group) and Navigator (Astrogator) of the Stars (Fieldwork)
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Information

[BAA-ebulletin 00778] GEMINID METEOR SHOWER NEARING PEAK

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BAA electronic bulletin
======================================================================

GEMINID METEOR SHOWER NEARING PEAK



The Geminid meteor shower is now underway, with peak activity expected
during the early morning hours of Saturday, 14th December 2013.



The Geminids are the richest of the annual meteor showers, with rates
outstripping those of the Perseids for a 24-hour interval centred on their
14 December maximum.  Unfortunately, this year's peak coincides with a
waxing gibbous Moon, only three days from full, in Aries/Taurus, so best
observed rates are most likely in the pre-dawn hours of December 14.
Observers are advised to direct their gaze away from the Moon, or to hide
the Moon behind an obstruction such as the wall of a house.



This year, Geminid maximum is expected at around 01h on Saturday, 14th
December, when the peak Geminid Zenithal Hourly Rate may reach 120 m/h.
There is the added bonus of an increased proportional abundance of bright
events after maximum; past observations show that bright Geminids become
more numerous some hours after the rates have peaked, a consequence of
particle-sorting in the meteor stream. Bright moonlight will, of course,
considerably reduce the number of meteors actually observed.



Geminid maximum is broad and it is important to have a spread of observers
making observations throughout the nights of 13th/14th December and on
14th/15th December to ensure adequate coverage of the shower maximum.  In
addition, observations by BAA members in North America and the Far East will
be welcomed by the Meteor Section to improve coverage of the period of peak
shower activity.



The Geminid radiant (at RA 07h 32m  Dec +33o, just north of Castor) rises
early on and reaches a respectable altitude well before midnight, so
observers who are unable to stay up late can still contribute useful
watches.



Meteor showers are supposed to come from periodic comets, yet there is no
very short period comet that matches the orbit of the Geminid meteoroid
stream. Instead, the orbit of the Geminids is occupied by an object called
3200 Phaethon, which looks remarkably like a rocky asteroid. A group of
astronomers led by David Jewitt of UCLA have been using NASA's STEREO probes
to take a closer look at 3200 Phaethon when it passes closest to the Sun. In
2010 one of the STEREO probes recorded a doubling of Phaethon's brightness
as it approached the Sun, as if sunlight were shining through a cloud of
dust around the asteroid.



The observers began to suspect 3200 Phaethon was something new - a "rock
comet" which is, essentially, an asteroid that approaches so close to the
Sun that solar heating scorches dusty debris right off its rocky surface
forming a tail of rocky grains. Seeing 3200 Phaethon sprout a tail, even a
small one, provides some confidence that Phaethon is indeed the source of
the Geminids - but a mystery remains: How can such a stubby protuberance
produce such a grand meteor shower? Only time and further continued
observations may provide the answer.



Geminid meteors enter the atmosphere at a relatively slow 35 km/sec, and
thanks to their robust (rocky/asteroidal as opposed to dusty/cometary)
nature tend to last longer than most in luminous flight. Unlike swift
Perseid or Orionid meteors, which last only a few tenths of a second,
Geminids may be visible for a second or longer, sometimes appearing to
fragment into a train of 'blobs'. Their relatively low speed and the
abundance of bright events makes the Geminids a prime target for imaging.



For further information, or copies of report forms, observing notes, and
details of how to carry out group meteor watches, please visit the BAA
Meteor Section website at http://britastro.org/meteor





This e-bulletin issued by:

John W. Mason, Director, BAA Meteor Section

2013 December 11



======================================================================
BAA-ebulletin mailing list visit:
http://lists.britastro.org/mailman/listinfo/baa-ebulletin
(c) 2013 British Astronomical Association    http://www.britastro.org/
======================================================================



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Good Clear Skies
--
Astrocomet
--
Colin James Watling
--
Various Voluntary work-Litter Picking for Parish Council (Daytime) and also a friend of Kessingland Beach (Watchman)
--
--
Real Astronomer and head of the Comet section for LYRA (Lowestoft and Great Yarmouth Regional Astronomers) also head of K.A.G (Kessingland Astronomy Group) and Navigator (Astrogator) of the Stars (Fieldwork)
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Information

Monday, 2 December 2013

[BAA-ebulletin 00776] Comet 2012 S1 (ISON)

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BAA electronic bulletin
======================================================================

Sadly the comet appears not to have survived its ordeal after all.  It steadily faded and became more diffuse after its initial reappearance.  I've posted a movie showing its passage through the C3 field on the Section web page. Something might be visible as the remnant moves into darker skies, but this is likely to require deep imaging.

To compensate, 2013 R1 (Lovejoy) is quite a nice object, with the tail becoming more prominent.  This is visible soon after dark, in Bootes.  Binoculars will help to find it, but if you have clear dark skies you may see it with the naked eye.  A better view will be had in the early morning when the comet is higher in the sky.

See http://www.ast.cam.ac.uk/~jds for updates on cometary activity, and links to other useful information such as the Computing Section finder charts.

Jonathan Shanklin
Director, Comet Section
======================================================================
BAA-ebulletin mailing list visit:
http://lists.britastro.org/mailman/listinfo/baa-ebulletin
(c) 2013 British Astronomical Association    http://www.britastro.org/
======================================================================

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Good Clear Skies
--
Astrocomet
--
Colin James Watling
--
Various Voluntary work-Litter Picking for Parish Council (Daytime) and also a friend of Kessingland Beach (Watchman)
--
--
Real Astronomer and head of the Comet section for LYRA (Lowestoft and Great Yarmouth Regional Astronomers) also head of K.A.G (Kessingland Astronomy Group) and Navigator (Astrogator) of the Stars (Fieldwork)
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Information

Saturday, 30 November 2013

Comet ISON Lives!

Space Weather News for Nov. 29, 2013
http://spaceweather.com

COMET ISON LIVES:  Cancel the funeral. Comet ISON is back from the dead. Yesterday, Nov. 28th, Comet ISON flew through the sun's atmosphere and appeared to disintegrate before the cameras of several NASA and ESA spacecraft. This prompted reports of the comet's demise. Today, the comet has revived and is rapidly brightening.  Visit http://spaceweather.com for images and updates.

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Good Clear Skies
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Astrocomet
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Colin James Watling
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Various Voluntary work-Litter Picking for Parish Council (Daytime) and also a friend of Kessingland Beach (Watchman)
--
--
Real Astronomer and head of the Comet section for LYRA (Lowestoft and Great Yarmouth Regional Astronomers) also head of K.A.G (Kessingland Astronomy Group) and Navigator (Astrogator) of the Stars (Fieldwork)
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Information

[BAA-ebulletin 00775] Comet 2012 S1 (ISON)

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BAA electronic bulletin
======================================================================
It seems that the comet has survived its close encounter with the Sun, thus increasing the chances of there being something to see in the coming weeks. You will need to get up early as the comet is most likely to be seen between 06:30 and 07:00 low in the east-south-east over the next few days, most likely from December 3 onwards. Tomorrow morning is probably too soon, but you never know, particularly if the comet is brighter than expected.  For the next week you will need a clear horizon as well as clear skies as the comet is very low down.  It gets higher in the sky, but will fade, though the tail may become more prominent.  The best views might come around 06:00 between December 7 and 14, and at the end of this period you might also see a few Geminid shooting stars.  By mid December it will be visible in the evening, and by Christmas it will be visible all night, though you may need binoculars to see it.   Sky & Telescope have some finder charts at http://www.skyandtelescope.com/observing/ataglance

There is another comet visible from the UK, 2013 R1 (Lovejoy), which may be seen in binoculars as a fuzzy patch, about half the size of the Moon, roughly 15 degrees west of the Plough near the top of Bootes.  It is at nearly the same altitude as the Plough at 18:00.  It continues to move west at two to three degrees per day.

Jonathan Shanklin
Director, Comet Section
======================================================================
BAA-ebulletin mailing list visit:
http://lists.britastro.org/mailman/listinfo/baa-ebulletin
(c) 2013 British Astronomical Association    http://www.britastro.org/
======================================================================

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Good Clear Skies
--
Astrocomet
--
Colin James Watling
--
Various Voluntary work-Litter Picking for Parish Council (Daytime) and also a friend of Kessingland Beach (Watchman)
--
--
Real Astronomer and head of the Comet section for LYRA (Lowestoft and Great Yarmouth Regional Astronomers) also head of K.A.G (Kessingland Astronomy Group) and Navigator (Astrogator) of the Stars (Fieldwork)

Thursday, 28 November 2013

Comet ISON Disintegrates

Space Weather News for  Nov. 28, 2013
http://spaceweather.com

RIP, Comet ISON? Evidence is mounting that Comet ISON did not survive its brush with the sun on Nov. 28th.  SOHO coronagraph images show the comet apparently disintegrating, while first-look images from the Solar Dynamics Observatory did not detect the comet moving along its expected path through the sun's atmosphere. Check http://spaceweather.com for movies and updates.

UNIQUE CHRISTMAS GIFT:  Would you like to give someone a solar flare for Christmas?  Click here to find out how: https://spaceweatherphone.com/SMSSignup/phone_sign_up.php?Signup_Type=BuySpaceWeatherGift


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Good Clear Skies
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Astrocomet
--
Colin James Watling
--
Various Voluntary work-Litter Picking for Parish Council (Daytime) and also a friend of Kessingland Beach (Watchman)
--
--
Real Astronomer and head of the Comet section for LYRA (Lowestoft and Great Yarmouth Regional Astronomers) also head of K.A.G (Kessingland Astronomy Group) and Navigator (Astrogator) of the Stars (Fieldwork)
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Information

Monday, 25 November 2013

Solar wind buffets Comet ISON--new movies from NASA

Space Weather News for Nov. 25, 2013
http://spaceweather.com

COMETS IN THE SOLAR WIND: NASA's STEREO-A spacecraft is obtaining some marvelous footage of Comet ISON and Comet Encke being buffeted by gusts of solar wind.  So far the two comets have avoided a direct strike by a CME, but a solar storm in the days ahead could have dramatic effects.  For movies and more, visit  http://spaceweather.com.

BE THE FIRST TO KNOW: Would you like to be the first to know when a solar flare blasts Comet ISON? X-flare alerts are available from http://spaceweathertext.com (text) and http://spaceweatherphone.com (voice).

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Good Clear Skies
--
Astrocomet
--
Colin James Watling
--
Various Voluntary work-Litter Picking for Parish Council (Daytime) and also a friend of Kessingland Beach (Watchman)
--
--
Real Astronomer and head of the Comet section for LYRA (Lowestoft and Great Yarmouth Regional Astronomers) also head of K.A.G (Kessingland Astronomy Group) and Navigator (Astrogator) of the Stars (Fieldwork)
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Information

SPA ENB No. 365

 

                The SOCIETY for POPULAR ASTRONOMY

        Electronic News Bulletin No. 365  2013 November 24


Here is the latest round-up of news from the Society for Popular
Astronomy.  The SPA is Britain's liveliest astronomical society, with
members all over the world.  We accept subscription payments online
at our secure site and can take credit and debit cards.  You can join
or renew via a secure server or just see how much we have to offer by
visiting    http://www.popastro.com/


COMET ISON
NASA

Comet ISON is now within the orbit of the Earth as it plunges headlong
towards the Sun for a close encounter on November 28.  Although it
is not as bright as many forecasts predicted, it is putting on a fair
show for observatories around the Solar System.  Spacecraft and
amateur astronomers alike are taking pictures of the comet's green
coma and filamentary double tail.  Because ISON has never passed
through the inner Solar System before (it is a first-time visitor from
the distant Oort cloud), experts do not know what will happen next.
Astronomers say that there are three possible outcomes:

1)  Disintegration before November 28.
    Some comets have disintegrated.  Recent examples include Comet
LINEAR (C/1999 S4) in 2000 and Comet Elenin (C/2010 X1) in 2011.
ISON is now reaching the region near the Sun where such comets have
disintegrated.  ISON is being observed by so many telescopes on Earth
and beyond that, if it does disintegrate, it will be the best-observed
case of cometary disruption in history.

2)  Disintegration and/or evaporation around November 28.
    If ISON survives the next few days intact, it faces a very close
approach to the Sun.  At perihelion, its equilibrium temperature
will be about 2700°C, hot enough to vaporize much of the dust and rock
on its surface.  While it may seem incredible that anything could
survive such a high temperature, the rate at which ISON might
evaporate is small in comparison with the size of the comet's nucleus.
ISON needs to be about 200 m across to survive; current estimates
of its actual size are in the range 500-2000 m.  It helps that the
comet is moving very fast, so it will not be exposed for long to such
a high temperature.  But even if it survives the rapid vaporization of
its exterior, it will get so close to the Sun that the Sun's gravity
might cause it to disintegrate.  Destroyed comets can still be
spectacular, though.  Sun-grazing Comet Lovejoy, for instance, passed
within 100,000 miles of the Sun's surface in 2011 December.  It
disintegrated, forming a spectacular tail of dust.

3)  Survival
    The final case is straightforward: ISON survives its brush with
the Sun and emerges with enough nuclear material to continue as an
active comet.  If it survives intact, it will probably lose enough
dust near the Sun to produce a fine tail, which at best might stretch
for tens of degrees and grace the early-morning sky somewhat as Comet
McNaught (C/2006 P1) did in 2007.


ASTEROID WITH SIX COMET-LIKE TAILS
NASA

Astronomers using the Hubble telescope have seen an asteroid,
designated P/2013 P5, with six comet-like tails of dust.  The tail
structures have changed dramatically in just 13 days as the comet has
ejected dust, as it has been doing from time to time for at least
some months.  Astronomers believe that the asteroid's rotation rate
may have increased to the point where its surface has started to fly
away.  They do not believe that the tails are the result of an impact
with another asteroid, because they have not seen a large quantity of
dust produced all at once.  Scientists using the Pan-STARRS survey
telescope in Hawaii announced their discovery of the asteroid on
August 27.  P/2013 P5 appeared as an unusually fuzzy-looking object.
The multiple tails were discovered when Hubble was used to take a more
detailed image on September 10.  When Hubble looked at the asteroid
again on September 23, its appearance had totally changed; it looked
as if the entire structure had swung round.

Modelling by the Max Planck Institute for Solar-System Research in
Lindau suggested that the tails could have been formed by a series of
impulsive dust-ejection events, on about April 15, July 18 and 24,
August 8 and 26, and September 4.  Radiation pressure from the Sun
stretched the dust into streamers.  Radiation pressure could also have
spun the asteroid up to such an extent that its weak gravity no longer
could hold it together.  If that happened, dust etc could slide to its
equator, shatter and fall off, and drift into space to make a tail.
So far, probably only about 100 to 1,000 tons of dust has been lost.
The asteroid's nucleus, about 300 m across, is thousands of times more
massive than the estimated amount of ejected dust.  Astronomers will
continue observing P/2013 P5 to see whether the dust leaves the
asteroid in the equatorial plane.  If it does, that would be strong
evidence for a rotational breakup.  It appears that P/2013 P5 is a
fragment of a larger asteroid that broke apart in a collision roughly
200 million years ago; there are many other fragments in similar
orbits.  Meteorites thought to have come from those bodies show
evidence of having been heated to as much as 800°C, making it likely
that the asteroid is composed of metamorphic rocks and does not hold
any ice as a comet does.


DAWN SPACECRAFT PROMPTS REVISION OF VESTA'S HISTORY
NASA/Jet Propulsion Laboratory

Data from the Dawn mission suggest that the history of the asteroid
Vesta is more complicated than was previously thought.  If Vesta's
formation had followed the script for the formation of rocky planets
like our own, heat from the interior would have created distinct,
separated layers of rock (generally, a core, mantle and crust).  In
that case, the mineral olivine should be concentrated in the mantle.
But Dawn's observations of the huge southern-hemisphere craters that
exposed the lower crust and should have excavated the mantle did not
find evidence of olivine there.  Instead, there were clear signatures
of olivine in the surface material in the northern hemisphere.  Such
blatant discrepancies from expectation must indicate, at the very
least, that Vesta has had a more complex evolutionary history than
had been supposed.


BLACK HOLES FOUND IN GLOBULAR STAR CLUSTERS
Texas Tech University

Globular star clusters are large groupings of stars thought to contain
some of the oldest stars in the Universe.  In the same distance as
from the Sun to Proxima Centauri, globular star clusters could have a
million to tens of millions of stars.  The stars are close enough
together to collide with one another occasionally.  It was believed
that the interaction of stars would be liable to eject any black holes
that formed.  While that theory may still be wrong, astronomers have
said it might still be somewhat true.  Black holes might still get
ejected from globular clusters, but not as readily as initially
believed.

In 2007, researchers made the first discovery of a black hole in a
globular star cluster, in the external galaxy NGC 4472.  They found it
by seeing X-ray emission from the gas falling into the black hole and
heating up to a few million degrees.  Now researchers from Texas have
discovered the first examples of black holes in a globular cluster in
our own Galaxy.  They used the Very Large Array of radio telescopes in
New Mexico, and detected a certain type of emission made by holes as
they assimilate stars.  When a hole captures a star, most of the
material falls into the hole, but some is thrown outwards in a jet,
with the emission of a characteristic type of radio signal.


HUBBLE OBSERVES SUPERNOVAE
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Supernovae occur when stars reach the ends of their 'lives' with
dramatic explosions, expelling most of their material into space.
Last year, a supernova called SN 2012im occurred in the spiral galaxy
NGC 6984.  Now another star in the same galaxy has exploded, forming
supernova SN 2013ek.  SN 2012im is called a Type Ic supernova, while
2013ek is a Type Ib.  Both types are caused by the core collapse of
massive stars that have shed their outer layers of hydrogen.  Type Ic
supernovae are thought to have lost more of their outer envelope than
Type Ib, including a layer of helium.  Hubble observations taken on
August 19 were intended to locate the new explosion more precisely.
It is so close to last year's that the two events seem to be linked --
the chance of two completely independent supernovae so close together
exploding within a year of one another is very small.  It was
initially suggested that the new one might be the old one somehow
flaring up again, but further observations indicate that they are
separate supernovae -- although they may be related in some as-yet-
unknown way.


MAVEN MARS ORBITER
NASA

Billions of years ago when the Solar System was young, Mars was a very
different world from the one it is today.  Liquid water flowed in long
rivers that emptied into lakes and shallow seas and a thick atmosphere
blanketed the planet and kept it warm.  In that environment, living
microbes might have found a home, starting Mars on a path to becoming
a second life-filled planet next to our own.  Today, Mars is bitterly
cold and desiccated.  Its thin atmosphere provides scant cover for a
surface marked by dry riverbeds and empty lakes.  In an effort to find
out what happened, NASA has sent to Mars a new orbiter called MAVEN
['Mars Atmosphere and Volatile EvolutioN'!], which is due to arrive in
September next year.

Mars could have been wet and warm 4 billion years ago only if it then
had a thick atmosphere.  A thick blanket of CO2 and other greenhouse
gases would have provided the warmer temperatures and the greater
atmospheric pressure required to keep liquid water from freezing solid
or boiling away.  Something caused Mars to lose that blanket.  One
possibility is the solar wind.  Unlike the Earth, Mars is not
protected by a global magnetic field.  Instead, there are 'magnetic
umbrellas' scattered around the planet, that shelter only part of the
atmosphere.  Erosion of exposed areas by the solar wind might have
slowly stripped the atmosphere away over billions of years.  Recent
isotopic measurements of the Martian atmosphere by the rover Curiosity
support that idea: light isotopes of hydrogen and argon are depleted
with respect to their heavier counterparts, suggesting that they have
been preferentially lost into space.

Scientists have also speculated that the planet's surface might have
absorbed the CO2 and locked it up in minerals such as carbonates, but
in recent years Mars rovers and orbiters have failed to find enough
carbonate to account for the missing gas.  MAVEN's instruments are
intended to document the flow of CO2 and other molecules into space.
Once scientists know how quickly Mars is losing CO2 now, they may be
able to extrapolate backwards in time to estimate the total amount
lost, and decide whether loss to space was the most important driver
of Martian climate change.

Bulletin compiled by Clive Down

(c) 2013 the Society for Popular Astronomy


website:  www.popastro.com

 
--
Good Clear Skies
--
Astrocomet
--
Colin James Watling
--
Various Voluntary work-Litter Picking for Parish Council (Daytime) and also a friend of Kessingland Beach (Watchman)
--
--
Real Astronomer and head of the Comet section for LYRA (Lowestoft and Great Yarmouth Regional Astronomers) also head of K.A.G (Kessingland Astronomy Group) and Navigator (Astrogator) of the Stars (Fieldwork)
--
Information

Amazing Photos of Comet ISON at Dawn

Space Weather News for Nov. 21, 2013
http://spaceweather.com

AMAZING COMET PIX: Comet ISON is plunging toward the sun for a perilous close encounter on Nov. 28th. Even experts aren't sure if the furiously vaporizing comet can survive its passage through the solar atmosphere on Thanksgiving Day.  Some of the final pictures from Earth may be coming in now--and they are amazing.  The comet, sporting a green head and streaming tail, is entering the rosy glow of dawn not far from the planet Mercury.  Visit http://spaceweather.com to see the latest images from around the world.

DON'T MISS THE NEXT SOLAR FLARE: Lately, solar activity has been high. Would you like a call when solar flares are underway? X-flare alerts are available from http://spaceweathertext.com (text) and http://spaceweatherphone.com (voice).

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Good Clear Skies
--
Astrocomet
--
Colin James Watling
--
Various Voluntary work-Litter Picking for Parish Council (Daytime) and also a friend of Kessingland Beach (Watchman)
--
--
Real Astronomer and head of the Comet section for LYRA (Lowestoft and Great Yarmouth Regional Astronomers) also head of K.A.G (Kessingland Astronomy Group) and Navigator (Astrogator) of the Stars (Fieldwork)
--
Information

Tuesday, 19 November 2013

Comet Lovejoy Finder Chart
 
Comet ISON Finder Chart
 

Monday, 18 November 2013

Comet ISON Update

Space Weather News for Nov. 16, 2013
http://spaceweather.com

COMET ISON UPDATE: Comet ISON is now ten times brighter than it was on
Nov. 13-14 when an unexpected outburst propelled the sundiver into the
realm of naked-eye visibility. Observers around the world confirm
seeing the comet as a faint smudge low in the eastern sky before
sunrise. Backyard telescopes reveal a riot of gaseous streamers
trailing behind the comet's brightening (and possibly fragmenting)
core. With almost two weeks to go before ISON plunges into the sun's
atmosphere, it is already one of the most beautiful and active comets
in years. Current images and observing tips may be found at
http://spaceweather.com.

DON'T MISS THE NEXT SOLAR FLARE: Lately, solar activity has been high.
Would you like a call when solar flares are underway? X-flare alerts
are available from http://spaceweathertext.com (text) and
http://spaceweatherphone.com (voice).


--
Good Clear Skies
--
Astrocomet
--
Colin James Watling
--
Various Voluntary work-Litter Picking for Parish Council (Daytime) and
also a friend of Kessingland Beach (Watchman)
--
Profile: http://www.google.com/profiles/astrocomera
--
Lyra Website: https://sites.google.com/site/lyrasociety/
--
Real Astronomer and head of the Comet section for LYRA (Lowestoft and
Great Yarmouth Regional Astronomers) also head of K.A.G (Kessingland
Astronomy Group) and Navigator (Astrogator) of the Stars (Fieldwork)

[BAA-ebulletin 00771] Comet 2012 S1 (ISON)

======================================================================
BAA electronic bulletin
======================================================================

Comet 2012 S1 (ISON) has brightened dramatically by over two
magnitudes and is now 5th magnitude or brighter. It is not clear
whether this brightening represents a terminal disruption or a
rejeuvenation of the active areas. Only further observation will show
which is the case. On the one hand it may continue to show a well
condensed inner coma, on the other hand the coma may steadily become
more diffuse. The brightness evolution is uncertain.

The inner coma region is particularly important, and imagers need to
take many short exposures in order to avoid saturation of features.
These can be stacked to show detail both in the inner coma and the
tail region as appropriate. Many recent images are over-exposed in
the inner coma region.

Comet 2013 R1 (Lovejoy) is nearing is likely peak brightness at around
5th magnitude. Both comets are best seen just before dawn.
Unfortunately high cloud covers much of the UK (despite the weather
forecast showing clear skies in the south) and this is likely to
prevent observation. Scotland looks better placed on Sunday morning,
whilst clear skies may be more widespread on Tuesday morning.

Further information on the comet is on the Section web page at
http://www.ast.cam.ac.uk/~jds

Jonathan Shanklin
Director, Comet Section

This message (and any attachments) is for the recipient only. NERC is
subject to the Freedom of Information Act 2000 and the contents of
this email and any reply you make may be disclosed by NERC unless it
is exempt from release under the Act. Any material supplied to NERC
may be stored in an electronic records management system.
======================================================================
BAA-ebulletin mailing list visit:
http://lists.britastro.org/mailman/listinfo/baa-ebulletin
(c) 2013 British Astronomical Association http://www.britastro.org/
======================================================================


--
Good Clear Skies
--
Astrocomet
--
Colin James Watling
--
Various Voluntary work-Litter Picking for Parish Council (Daytime) and
also a friend of Kessingland Beach (Watchman)
--
Profile: http://www.google.com/profiles/astrocomera
--
Lyra Website: https://sites.google.com/site/lyrasociety/
--
Real Astronomer and head of the Comet section for LYRA (Lowestoft and
Great Yarmouth Regional Astronomers) also head of K.A.G (Kessingland
Astronomy Group) and Navigator (Astrogator) of the Stars (Fieldwork)

Thursday, 14 November 2013

Comet ISON Outburst

Space Weather News for Nov. 14, 2013
http://spaceweather.com

COMET ISON OUTBURST: Observers around the world are reporting a sharp
increase in the brightness of sundiving Comet ISON. Formerly dim, it
is now on the threshold of naked-eye visibility. Comet ISON is
plunging toward the sun for a perilous pass through the solar
atmosphere on Thanksgiving Day (Nov. 28th). This could be the first
of many brightening events as intensifying solar heat erodes material
away from the comet's nucleus. For more information and updates,
visit http://spaceweather.com

DON'T MISS THE NEXT SOLAR FLARE: Lately, solar activity has been high.
Would you like a call when solar flares are underway? X-flare alerts
are available from http://spaceweathertext.com (text) and
http://spaceweatherphone.com (voice).


--
Good Clear Skies
--
Astrocomet
--
Colin James Watling
--
Various Voluntary work-Litter Picking for Parish Council (Daytime) and
also a friend of Kessingland Beach (Watchman)
--
Profile: http://www.google.com/profiles/astrocomera
--
Lyra Website: https://sites.google.com/site/lyrasociety/
--
Real Astronomer and head of the Comet section for LYRA (Lowestoft and
Great Yarmouth Regional Astronomers) also head of K.A.G (Kessingland
Astronomy Group) and Navigator (Astrogator) of the Stars (Fieldwork)

Wednesday, 13 November 2013

Goodbye, GOCE
12-11-2013 02:30 PM CET

 Last look at GOCE as it reentered Earth’s atmosphere near the Falkland Islands

Charts-info Astrosite Groningen (November 13, 2013)

Dear comet observers,

We have prepared the following new chart for our homepage:

C/2012 S1 (ISON):

- a 15x20 degrees chart for the period 14 - 21 November 2013

This new chart is now available in the charts section of our
mainpage at: http://www.shopplaza.nl/astro

Reinder Bouma/Edwin van Dijk
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
----------------------------------------------------------------------------


--
Good Clear Skies
--
Astrocomet
--
Colin James Watling
--
Various Voluntary work-Litter Picking for Parish Council (Daytime) and
also a friend of Kessingland Beach (Watchman)
--
Profile: http://www.google.com/profiles/astrocomera
--
Lyra Website: https://sites.google.com/site/lyrasociety/
--
Real Astronomer and head of the Comet section for LYRA (Lowestoft and
Great Yarmouth Regional Astronomers) also head of K.A.G (Kessingland
Astronomy Group) and Navigator (Astrogator) of the Stars (Fieldwork)

[BAA-ebulletin 00770] Comet C/2012 S1 (ISON)

======================================================================
BAA electronic bulletin
======================================================================
This comet is now only 15 days from perihelion and it is currently
0.66 AU from the Sun. In recent days it has been seen to brighten as
expected and it is now around magnitude 7. There has also been a
noticeable increase in the level of activity within the tail. The
rather bland and uniform dust tail has been supplemented by a number
of straight gas streamers which are now relatively easy to image.

The main dust tail has broadened and is now around 1 degree long and
today's observations show that the gas tail has undergone a
disconnection event due to its interaction with the solar wind. This
is clearly visible in images obtained by BAA observer Tony Angel:

http://britastro.org/baa/index.php?view=detail&id=1908&option=com_joomgallery&Itemid=200

The comet is currently a morning object low in the eastern dawn sky
with a very short observing window before the onset of twilight.
Despite the difficult conditions it would be very worthwhile to make
an attempt to observe this object. We cannot reliably predict what
will happen in the coming weeks since we have never before seen a
comet with these characteristics pass so close to the sun. Only
continued observations will help us to tell the final tale.

It is worth noting that due to the comet's brightness and tail length
the most suitable imaging instruments are now the very popular (and
fairly common) 80mm apochromatic refractors coupled to CCDs or DSLRs.
This type of instrument tends to be portable so it can be taken to a
site with a clear eastern horizon.

Drawings, images, written accounts and visual magnitude estimates are
welcome and can be posted via email to cometobs@britastro.org. It
would help greatly if you could conform to the file naming convention
documented here:

http://www.ast.cam.ac.uk/~jds/cimgname.htm

Images of this comet taken by BAA observers and others up the present
date can be seen on the BAA Comet Gallery:

http://britastro.org/baa/index.php?view=category&catid=74&option=com_joomgallery&Itemid=200

The increase in activity during the past week could be a sign that the
comet may become a naked eye object at some point around perihelion or
just after. Of course, at the time of perihelion the comet will not be
observable using basic observing techniques due to its close proximity
to the sun.

The best source of information about the comet during the next few
weeks can be found at the NASA CIOC website:

http://www.isoncampaign.org/Present

There is another naked eye comet currently available in the night sky.
This is C/2013 R1 (Lovejoy). This comet is best seen around midnight
and onwards. It is presently in Leo and images of this comet taken by
BAA observers can be found on the BAA Comet Gallery:

http://britastro.org/baa/index.php?view=category&catid=133&option=com_joomgallery&Itemid=200

Denis Buczynski
Secretary Comet Section
British Astronomical Association
======================================================================
BAA-ebulletin mailing list visit:
http://lists.britastro.org/mailman/listinfo/baa-ebulletin
(c) 2013 British Astronomical Association http://www.britastro.org/
======================================================================


--
Good Clear Skies
--
Astrocomet
--
Colin James Watling
--
Various Voluntary work-Litter Picking for Parish Council (Daytime) and
also a friend of Kessingland Beach (Watchman)
--
Profile: http://www.google.com/profiles/astrocomera
--
Lyra Website: https://sites.google.com/site/lyrasociety/
--
Real Astronomer and head of the Comet section for LYRA (Lowestoft and
Great Yarmouth Regional Astronomers) also head of K.A.G (Kessingland
Astronomy Group) and Navigator (Astrogator) of the Stars (Fieldwork)

Monday, 11 November 2013

Solar Activity is High as a Big Sunspot Turns to Face Earth

Space Weather News for Nov. 8, 2013
http://spaceweather.com

HIGH SOLAR ACTIVITY: This week, Jupiter-sized sunspot AR1890 unleashed
two brief but intense X-class solar flares and numerous M-class solar
flares. More eruptions are in the offing as the sunspot turns to
directly face Earth over the weekend. X-flare alerts are available
from http://spaceweathertext.com (text) and
http://spaceweatherphone.com (voice).

--
Good Clear Skies
--
Astrocomet
--
Colin James Watling
--
Various Voluntary work-Litter Picking for Parish Council (Daytime) and
also a friend of Kessingland Beach (Watchman)
--
Profile: http://www.google.com/profiles/astrocomera
--
Lyra Website: https://sites.google.com/site/lyrasociety/
--
Real Astronomer and head of the Comet section for LYRA (Lowestoft and
Great Yarmouth Regional Astronomers) also head of K.A.G (Kessingland
Astronomy Group) and Navigator (Astrogator) of the Stars (Fieldwork)

Charts-info Astrosite Groningen (November 10, 2013)

Dear comet observers,

We have prepared the following new chart for our homepage:

C/2013 R1 (Lovejoy):

- a 12x16 degrees chart for the period 11 - 16 November 2013

This new chart is now available in the charts section of our
mainpage at: http://www.shopplaza.nl/astro

Reinder Bouma/Edwin van Dijk
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
----------------------------------------------------------------------------


--
Good Clear Skies
--
Astrocomet
--
Colin James Watling
--
Various Voluntary work-Litter Picking for Parish Council (Daytime) and
also a friend of Kessingland Beach (Watchman)
--
Profile: http://www.google.com/profiles/astrocomera
--
Lyra Website: https://sites.google.com/site/lyrasociety/
--
Real Astronomer and head of the Comet section for LYRA (Lowestoft and
Great Yarmouth Regional Astronomers) also head of K.A.G (Kessingland
Astronomy Group) and Navigator (Astrogator) of the Stars (Fieldwork)

Sungrazing Comet ISON now visible in binoculars

Space Weather News for Nov. 9, 2013
http://spaceweather.com

COMET NEWS: Observers around the world report that Comet ISON is now
visible in binoculars. The comet is brightening as it plunges toward
the sun for a perilous pass through the solar atmosphere on Nov. 28th.
It is not, however, the brightest comet in the night sky. As
November unfolds, there is a rare gathering of four comets rising in
the east before dawn. Visit http://spaceweather.com to find out which
one is outshining media-favorite ISON.

DON'T MISS THE NEXT SOLAR FLARE: Lately, solar activity has been high.
Would you like a call when solar flares are underway? X-flare alerts
are available from http://spaceweathertext.com (text) and
http://spaceweatherphone.com (voice).

--
Good Clear Skies
--
Astrocomet
--
Colin James Watling
--
Various Voluntary work-Litter Picking for Parish Council (Daytime) and
also a friend of Kessingland Beach (Watchman)
--
Profile: http://www.google.com/profiles/astrocomera
--
Lyra Website: https://sites.google.com/site/lyrasociety/
--
Real Astronomer and head of the Comet section for LYRA (Lowestoft and
Great Yarmouth Regional Astronomers) also head of K.A.G (Kessingland
Astronomy Group) and Navigator (Astrogator) of the Stars (Fieldwork)

SPA ENB No. 364

                           

                  The SOCIETY for POPULAR ASTRONOMY

         Electronic News Bulletin No. 364   2013 November 10


Here is the latest round-up of news from the Society for Popular
Astronomy.  The SPA is Britain's liveliest astronomical society, with
members all over the world.  We accept subscription payments online
at our secure site and can take credit and debit cards.  You can join
or renew via a secure server or just see how much we have to offer by
visiting    http://www.popastro.com/


ASTEROID 2013 TV135
NASA

The then-undiscovered asteroid 2013 TV135 made a close approach to
the Earth on Sept. 16, when it came within about 6.7 million km.  The
asteroid is estimated to be about 400 m across and its orbit carries
it out to about three quarters of the distance to Jupiter.  It was
discovered on 2013 Oct. 8 by astronomers working at the Crimean
Astrophysical Observatory in Ukraine.  It is one of more than 10,000
near-Earth objects that have been discovered.  With only a month of
observations for an orbital period of almost four years, its orbit is
still poorly determined, but it looks as if the asteroid could be back
in our neighbourhood in 2032.  The object will be in the accessible
part of the sky in the coming months, and the refinement of the orbit
is likely to show that there is no risk of Earth impact in 2032.


EXOPLANET TALLY ABOVE 1,000
BBC News

The number of observed exoplanets now stands informally at 1,010,
bolstered by 11 new finds from the UK's Wide-Angle Search for Planets
(WASP).  The Kepler space telescope, which discovered many such
planets in recent years, broke down earlier this year, but it left a
list of more than 3,500 other candidates that have not yet been
followed up.


MOST DISTANT KNOWN GALAXY DISCOVERED
University of California

Astronomers have discovered the most distant galaxy yet found. The
galaxy is seen as it was 'just' 700 million years after the Big Bang,
when the Universe was only about 5 per cent of its current age of 13.8
billion years.  The team identified a very distant galaxy candidate in
optical and infrared images taken by the Hubble telescope.  Follow-up
observations, made in Hawaii by the Keck telescope with its new
multi-object spectrograph 'MOSFIRE', allowed its redshift to be
determined at 7.5 -- the Lyman-alpha emission line of hydrogen, whose
wavelength 'at rest' is far down in the ultraviolet, was observed
shifted into the red part of the spectrum.  The observations showed
that the distant galaxy, prosaically named z8-GND-5296, is forming
stars extremely rapidly -- producing each year stars totalling about
300 times the mass of our Sun, about 100 times the rate of star
formation in the Milky Way.


COULD A MILKY WAY SUPERNOVA BE VISIBLE IN NEXT 50 YEARS?
Ohio State University

Astronomers have estimated the odds that, some time during the next 50
years, a supernova occurring in our home galaxy will be visible to us.
They think it very likely that such a supernova will be visible to
telescopes operating in the infrared, but the chance that the
spectacle would be visible to the naked eye in the nighttime sky is
only 20 per cent or less.  We see supernovae go off in other galaxies
every few days, but we could learn more about them if we can catch one
in our Galaxy and study it with all available instruments, including
new types such as detectors of neutrinos and gravitational waves.
Astronomers' contingency plans hope to take advantage of the fact that
supernovae issue neutrinos immediately after the explosion starts, but
don't brighten in infrared or visible light until minutes, hours, or
even days later.  So, with luck, neutrino detectors such as Super-
Kamiokande in Japan would sound the alert the moment they detect
neutrinos, and indicate the direction the particles were coming from.
Then infrared detectors could target the location almost immediately,
catching the supernova before the brightening begins.  Gravitational-
wave observatories might do the same.  Not all neutrinos, however,
come from supernovae -- some come from nuclear reactors, the Earth's
atmosphere or the Sun -- but there have been suggestions as to how
ones of supernova origin might be distinguished.

For those of us who might hope to see a Milky Way supernova with our
own eyes, however, the chances are low and depend on our latitude --
the southern hemisphere is favoured because most of the Galaxy is seen
from there.  The last time it happened was in 1604, when Johannes
Kepler observed one some 20,000 light years away in the constellation
Ophiuchus.  So it would have been unproductive for anyone to have sat
on the edge of his chair for the last 400 years hoping to see the next
one!


INDIA'S MARS-ORBITER MISSION
The Planetary Society

The Indian Space Research Organization has told how its 'Polar
Satellite Launch Vehicle' has placed its Mars-bound spacecraft into a
highly elliptical parking orbit with a perigee of 248 km and an apogee
of 23,000 km.  Over an interval of about a month, six orbital
manoeuvres will gradually increase the distance of the apogee, and
finally a seventh one will put the craft on a path that will take it
to Mars.  The cruise to Mars will take about ten months.  Its orbit
round Mars will likewise be highly elliptical.  The spacecraft
carries a small payload of five instruments with a total mass of 15
kilograms.  The scientific goals of the mission have not been spelt
out in any detail: "Exploration of Mars surface features, morphology,
mineralogy, and Martian atmosphere by indigenous scientific
instruments."  ["Indigenous" means 'developed in India'.]  The
instruments consist of a Lyman-alpha photometer, methane sensor,
'Exospheric Neutral Composition Analyser', colour camera and
thermal-infrared imaging spectrometer.

But what this mission is really about is the development of India's
capability in space -- the technological objectives are the main
drivers.  ISRO states three objectives:
1.  Design and realisation of a Mars orbiter able to
survive and perform Earth-bound manoeuvres, cruise phase of 300 days,
Mars orbit insertion/capture, and on-orbit phase around Mars.
2.  Deep-space communication, navigation, mission planning and
management.
3.  Incorporate autonomous features to handle contingency situations.

Each of the three is a substantial challenge, and achieving any one
of them will demonstrate new capability for India.


BBC CONFIRMS THAT 'THE SKY AT NIGHT' WILL CONTINUE

The BBC has announced that the programme 'The Sky At Night' will
continue next year.  From February, it will be in a new monthly
half-hour slot on BBC4, with repeats on BBC2.  Kim Shillinglaw, Head
of Commissioning for BBC Science and Natural History, says: "Sir
Patrick Moore inspired generations of astronomers and I hope that,
alongside the BBC's other astronomy content such as BBC2's Stargazing
Live, The Sky at Night will enthuse further generations about the
wonder of the night sky."  The Sky at Night was first broadcast on
1957 April 24 and continued to be presented by Sir Patrick Moore until
his death in 2012, making it the longest-running programme with the
same presenter in television history.  Since Moore's death, the
series has been fronted by various stand-in presenters.


Bulletin compiled by Clive Down

(c) 2013 the Society for Popular Astronomy


Society for Popular Astronomy | 36 Fairway, Keyworth
This email was sent to astrocomera@googlemail.com
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--
Good Clear Skies
--
Astrocomet
--
Colin James Watling
--
Various Voluntary work-Litter Picking for Parish Council (Daytime) and also a friend of Kessingland Beach (Watchman)
--
--
Real Astronomer and head of the Comet section for LYRA (Lowestoft and Great Yarmouth Regional Astronomers) also head of K.A.G (Kessingland Astronomy Group) and Navigator (Astrogator) of the Stars (Fieldwork)
--
Information

Thursday, 7 November 2013

[BAA-ebulletin 00769] Morning comets

======================================================================
BAA electronic bulletin
======================================================================

For those that don't mind getting up in the early hours there are four
comets that can be seen in binoculars, although you will need large
binoculars for three of them.

Best is 2013 R1 (Lovejoy) which has brightened rapidly and is now on
the borders of naked eye visibility. It is visible from about
midnight onwards and is highest as dawn breaks. At the moment the
Beehive Cluster in Cancer makes a good starting point for sweeping
towards the comet, which looks a bit like a globular cluster, but see
the Computing Section webpages for good finder charts. Those that
don't like an early morning could wait until later in the month when
it is at its brightest, but low in the sky below the Plough.

As previously explained 2012 S1 (ISON) never looked very likely to be
the spectacular sight brighter than the full moon and visible in broad
daylight that some pundits predicted. In the event it has brightened
even more slowly than my cautious predictions. The nucleus appears to
be smaller than the normal limit for surviving perihelion, so if you
want to see the comet, now is probably the time. From a darkish site
it is visible in 20x80B, but is just a faint fuzzy patch. A telescope
may show the prominent tail that is visible in some of the excellent
images that you can see in the Section image gallery. Predicting its
future brightness is a bit of a lottery, so keep an eye on the Section
web page for the latest news, magnitude predictions for the bright
comets are usually updated on Thursdays.

2P/Encke has a long history of observation, and this is one of the
better returns for Northern Hemisphere observers. It is beginning to
drop into the dawn twilight, but can still be seen as a large fuzzy
patch. Images show a narrow gas tail.

Finally 2012 X1 (LINEAR) provided a surprise when it suddenly
brightened by five magnitudes, in an outburst similar to those seen in
17P/Holmes and 29P/Schwassmann-Wachmann. It was clearly a classical
explosive outburst and images show the steadily expanding coma.
Although just visible in large binoculars, it will probably fade from
view as the coma becomes more diffuse.

Observations of the above comets are welcome, particularly visual
estimates of the total magnitude. Details of the technique and format
for reporting the observations is in the Section guide to observing
comets, of which a new issue is in preparation. As always, the
Section web page is updated several times a week and will usually have
the latest information on observable comets.

Jonathan Shanklin
Director, Comet Section

This message (and any attachments) is for the recipient only. NERC is
subject to the Freedom of Information Act 2000 and the contents of
this email and any reply you make may be disclosed by NERC unless it
is exempt from release under the Act. Any material supplied to NERC
may be stored in an electronic records management system.
======================================================================
BAA-ebulletin mailing list visit:
http://lists.britastro.org/mailman/listinfo/baa-ebulletin
(c) 2013 British Astronomical Association http://www.britastro.org/
======================================================================


--
Good Clear Skies
--
Astrocomet
--
Colin James Watling
--
Various Voluntary work-Litter Picking for Parish Council (Daytime) and
also a friend of Kessingland Beach (Watchman)
--
Profile: http://www.google.com/profiles/astrocomera
--
Lyra Website: https://sites.google.com/site/lyrasociety/
--
Real Astronomer and head of the Comet section for LYRA (Lowestoft and
Great Yarmouth Regional Astronomers) also head of K.A.G (Kessingland
Astronomy Group) and Navigator (Astrogator) of the Stars (Fieldwork)

Burn ATV-4, burn

05-11-2013 04:34 PM CET
 
Human spaceflight and operations image of the week: ATV Albert Einstein burns up on reentry into Earth’s atmosphere.

 
--
Good Clear Skies
--
Astrocomet
--
Colin James Watling
--
Various Voluntary work-Litter Picking for Parish Council (Daytime) and also a friend of Kessingland Beach (Watchman)
--
--
--
Real Astronomer and head of the Comet section for LYRA (Lowestoft and Great Yarmouth Regional Astronomers) also head of K.A.G (Kessingland Astronomy Group) and Navigator (Astrogator) of the Stars (Fieldwork)

Monday, 4 November 2013

Charts-info Astrosite Groningen (November 4, 2013)

Dear comet observers,

We have prepared the following new chart for our homepage:

C/2012 X1 (LINEAR):

- a 4.5x6.0 degrees chart for the period 5 - 14 November 2013

These new charts are now available in the charts section of our
mainpage at: http://www.shopplaza.nl/astro

Reinder Bouma/Edwin van Dijk
----------------------------------------------------------------------------

----------------------------------------------------------------------------


--
Good Clear Skies
--
Astrocomet
--
Colin James Watling
--
Various Voluntary work-Litter Picking for Parish Council (Daytime) and
also a friend of Kessingland Beach (Watchman)
--
Profile: http://www.google.com/profiles/astrocomera
--
Lyra Website: https://sites.google.com/site/lyrasociety/
--
Real Astronomer and head of the Comet section for LYRA (Lowestoft and
Great Yarmouth Regional Astronomers) also head of K.A.G (Kessingland
Astronomy Group) and Navigator (Astrogator) of the Stars (Fieldwork)

GOCE falling back to Earth....

Re-Entry expected between November the 5th-baa and November 10th.....

http://spaceflightnow.com/news/n1311/02goce/


--
Good Clear Skies
--
Astrocomet
--
Colin James Watling
--
Various Voluntary work-Litter Picking for Parish Council (Daytime) and
also a friend of Kessingland Beach (Watchman)
--
Profile: http://www.google.com/profiles/astrocomera
--
Lyra Website: https://sites.google.com/site/lyrasociety/
--
Real Astronomer and head of the Comet section for LYRA (Lowestoft and
Great Yarmouth Regional Astronomers) also head of K.A.G (Kessingland
Astronomy Group) and Navigator (Astrogator) of the Stars (Fieldwork)

Sundays Solar Eclipse....

http://earthsky.org/tonight/total-solar-eclipse-for-equatorial-africa-on-november-3?utm_source=EarthSky+News&utm_campaign=bd48fc3345-EarthSky_News&utm_medium=email&utm_term=0_c643945d79-bd48fc3345-393732205

--
Good Clear Skies
--
Astrocomet
--
Colin James Watling
--
Various Voluntary work-Litter Picking for Parish Council (Daytime) and
also a friend of Kessingland Beach (Watchman)
--
Profile: http://www.google.com/profiles/astrocomera
--
Lyra Website: https://sites.google.com/site/lyrasociety/
--
Real Astronomer and head of the Comet section for LYRA (Lowestoft and
Great Yarmouth Regional Astronomers) also head of K.A.G (Kessingland
Astronomy Group) and Navigator (Astrogator) of the Stars (Fieldwork)

Sunday, 3 November 2013

Solar Eclipse on Sunday, Nov. 3rd

Space Weather News for Nov. 2, 2013
http://spaceweather.com

SOLAR ECLIPSE: Early Sunday morning, Nov. 3rd, sky watchers along the
east coast of North America might notice something missing--a piece of
the sun. A partial solar eclipse will be underway at sunrise. In the
United States, visibility stretches all the way from Maine to the
southern tip of Florida. Later, the Moon will cover the entire sun
producing a total eclipse over parts of the Atlantic Ocean and Africa.
Visit http://spaceweather.com for observing tips and more
information.

DON'T MISS THE NEXT SOLAR FLARE: Lately, solar activity has been high.
Would you like a call when solar flares are underway? X-flare alerts
are available from http://spaceweathertext.com (text) and
http://spaceweatherphone.com (voice).


--
Good Clear Skies
--
Astrocomet
--
Colin James Watling
--
Various Voluntary work-Litter Picking for Parish Council (Daytime) and
also a friend of Kessingland Beach (Watchman)
--
Profile: http://www.google.com/profiles/astrocomera
--
Lyra Website: https://sites.google.com/site/lyrasociety/
--
Real Astronomer and head of the Comet section for LYRA (Lowestoft and
Great Yarmouth Regional Astronomers) also head of K.A.G (Kessingland
Astronomy Group) and Navigator (Astrogator) of the Stars (Fieldwork)

Tuesday, 29 October 2013

[BAA-ebulletin 00768] Reminder of meeting this Wednesday

======================================================================
BAA electronic bulletin
======================================================================


I would like to remind you that the next meeting of the BAA will be on
Wednesday 30th October in the new lecture room, Burlington House.


17.30 Open AGM, minutes, report on accounts
17.45 President's review of year and presentation of awards
18.15 Council ballot results
18.20 Presidential Address
19.20 Close AGM
19.20 Open OM, minutes, notices
19.25 Sky Notes
19.45 Close


Doors open at 17.00 and the meeting will start at 17.30 and is due to
finish by 18:00. Tea will be served in the library from 17:00

Hope to see you there


--
Hazel Collett
Meetings Secretary for the British Astronomical Association
======================================================================
BAA-ebulletin mailing list visit:
http://lists.britastro.org/mailman/listinfo/baa-ebulletin
(c) 2013 British Astronomical Association http://www.britastro.org/
======================================================================


--
Good Clear Skies
--
Astrocomet
--
Colin James Watling
--
Various Voluntary work-Litter Picking for Parish Council (Daytime) and
also a friend of Kessingland Beach (Watchman)
--
Profile: http://www.google.com/profiles/astrocomera
--
Lyra Website: https://sites.google.com/site/lyrasociety/
--
Real Astronomer and head of the Comet section for LYRA (Lowestoft and
Great Yarmouth Regional Astronomers) also head of K.A.G (Kessingland
Astronomy Group) and Navigator (Astrogator) of the Stars (Fieldwork)

Monday, 28 October 2013

Strong Solar Activity on Oct. 25th

Space Weather News for Oct. 25, 2013
http://spaceweather.com

GLOBAL SOLAR ACTIVITY: Solar activity is high and intensifying. This
morning, new sunspot AR1882 unleashed an X1-class solar flare. The
flare was bracketed by two erupting magnetic filaments--an ensemble of
explosions that involved more than half of the solar disk. For more
information on these blasts and possible Earth-effects, visit
http://spaceweather.com

SOLAR FLARE ALERTS: Would you like a call when solar flares are
underway? X-flare alerts are available from
http://spaceweathertext.com (text) and http://spaceweatherphone.com
(voice).

--
Good Clear Skies
--
Astrocomet
--
Colin James Watling
--
Various Voluntary work-Litter Picking for Parish Council (Daytime) and
also a friend of Kessingland Beach (Watchman)
--
Profile: http://www.google.com/profiles/astrocomera
--
Lyra Website: https://sites.google.com/site/lyrasociety/
--
Real Astronomer and head of the Comet section for LYRA (Lowestoft and
Great Yarmouth Regional Astronomers) also head of K.A.G (Kessingland
Astronomy Group) and Navigator (Astrogator) of the Stars (Fieldwork)

[BAA-ebulletin 00767] BAA Solar Section - Activity Warning

======================================================================
BAA electronic bulletin
======================================================================

Active Region 1882 has unleashed two X-class solar flares today.
AR1875 and AR1877 are also currently active. Observations/images are
requested in the coming days from these sunspot groups.
NOAA activity warning is produced below:

Solar activity is very high. New region NOAA 11882 in the SE produced
two X-class flares; an X1.7 at 07:53 UT and an X2.1 at 14:51 UT today.
It also produced two M-class flares.
Numerous C-class flares were observed from regions NOAA 11875 and 11882,
as well as a C1.8 from NOAA 11869 (N12 over the west limb) at 13:06 UT.
NOAA 11882 was too near the limb yesterday for a good determination of its
magnetic field configuration, but current SDO magnetograms show it as
beta-gamma-delta class. This region is expected to produce M-class flares
and an additional X-class flare is possible.
NOAA 11875 may produce an additional M-class event, but an X-class
flare seems less likely from this region. NOAA 11877 may produce
an M-class flare.
NOAA 11882, S08 E63 (X=-853,Y=-172). Beta-gamma-delta region.
NOAA 11875, N08 W33 (X= 523,Y= 64). Beta-gamma-delta region.
NOAA 11877, S12 W13 (X= 213,Y=-281). Beta-gamma region.


======================================================================
BAA-ebulletin mailing list visit:
http://lists.britastro.org/mailman/listinfo/baa-ebulletin
(c) 2013 British Astronomical Association http://www.britastro.org/
======================================================================


--
Good Clear Skies
--
Astrocomet
--
Colin James Watling
--
Various Voluntary work-Litter Picking for Parish Council (Daytime) and
also a friend of Kessingland Beach (Watchman)
--
Profile: http://www.google.com/profiles/astrocomera
--
Lyra Website: https://sites.google.com/site/lyrasociety/
--
Real Astronomer and head of the Comet section for LYRA (Lowestoft and
Great Yarmouth Regional Astronomers) also head of K.A.G (Kessingland
Astronomy Group) and Navigator (Astrogator) of the Stars (Fieldwork)

Back To Greenwich.....

http://www.timeanddate.com/newsletter/october2013.html

--
Good Clear Skies
--
Astrocomet
--
Colin James Watling
--
Various Voluntary work-Litter Picking for Parish Council (Daytime) and
also a friend of Kessingland Beach (Watchman)
--
Profile: http://www.google.com/profiles/astrocomera
--
Lyra Website: https://sites.google.com/site/lyrasociety/
--
Real Astronomer and head of the Comet section for LYRA (Lowestoft and
Great Yarmouth Regional Astronomers) also head of K.A.G (Kessingland
Astronomy Group) and Navigator (Astrogator) of the Stars (Fieldwork)