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Tuesday, 30 December 2014

Geomagnetic Storm and Naked-eye Comet

Space Weather News for Dec. 29, 2014
http://spaceweather.com

GEOMAGNETIC STORM: The year is ending with an outbreak of auroras.
Sky watchers around the Arctic Circle are seeing bright Northern
Lights as Earth enters a stream of high-speed solar wind, causing
G1-class storm conditions on Dec. 29th. Visit http://spaceweather.com
for images and updates.

BRIGHTENING COMET: The "Christmas Comet" C/2014 Q2 (Lovejoy) has
continued to brighten, and now observers around the world are
reporting seeing it with the unaided eye from dark-sky sites. Comet
Lovejoy is a fine target for backyard telescopes, as shown on today's
edition of http://spaceweather.com

AURORA ALERTS are available from http://spaceweathertext.com (text)
and http://spaceweatherphone.com (voice).

--
Good Clear Skies
--
Astrocomet
--
Colin James Watling
--
Various Voluntary work-Litter Picking for Parish Council (Daytime) and
also a friend of Kessingland Beach (Watchman)
--
Profile: http://www.google.com/profiles/astrocomera
--
Real Astronomer and head of the Comet section for LYRA (Lowestoft and
Great Yarmouth Regional Astronomers) also head of K.A.G (Kessingland
Astronomy Group) and Navigator (Astrogator) of the Stars (Fieldwork)
--
Lyra Main Website: http://www.lyra-astro.co.uk/
--
Info: http://www.clubbz.com/club/2895/lowestoft/lowestoft_and_great_yarmouth_regional_astronomers_(lyra)

Wednesday, 24 December 2014

The Christmas and New Year Comet

CHRISTMAS COMET: Is there a cylindrical package under your Christmas tree? Open it now. A small telescope is all you need to see Comet Lovejoy (C/2014 Q2). Discovered just last August by Terry Lovejoy in Australia, the green comet is brightening faster than expected as it moves into northern skies just in time for Christmas. Trace the comet's tail down the page for more information:
Gerald Rhemann took this picture on Dec. 21st using a remotely-operated telescope in Namibia. The comet's sinuous blue ion tail contrasts beautifully with its puffy green atmosphere. The colors come from ionized carbon monoxide (CO+) and diatomic carbon (C2), which glow blue and green, respectively, in the near-vacuum of interplanetary space.
"Last night (Dec. 23rd), the comet was easy to see in binoculars as a 5th magnitude fuzzy star," reports Alan Dyer of New Mexico. "I could just see the comet naked eye knowing exactly where to look south of Orion in the constellation Columba the dove."
Where is that? These finder charts from Sky and Telescope can help you find the comet. Better yet, if that cylindrical object is a GOTO telescope, just plug in the comet's coordinates and let the telecope find it for you

Fantastically Colorful Clouds Spotted in Arctic Stratosphere

Space Weather News for Dec. 22, 2014
http://spaceweather.com

STRATOSPHERIC CLOUDS: Around the Arctic Circle, sky watchers are
seeing fantastic colors--but it's not the aurora borealis. A rare
outbreak of polar stratospheric clouds is underway over our planet's
north polar region. These clouds, which are associated with the
formation of ozone holes, float much higher than ordinary clouds and
produce unforgettable colors during the hours around sunset. Visit
http://spaceweather.com for pictures and updates.

--
Good Clear Skies
--
Astrocomet
--
Colin James Watling
--
Various Voluntary work-Litter Picking for Parish Council (Daytime) and
also a friend of Kessingland Beach (Watchman)
--
Profile: http://www.google.com/profiles/astrocomera
--
Real Astronomer and head of the Comet section for LYRA (Lowestoft and
Great Yarmouth Regional Astronomers) also head of K.A.G (Kessingland
Astronomy Group) and Navigator (Astrogator) of the Stars (Fieldwork)
--
Lyra Main Website: http://www.lyra-astro.co.uk/
--
Info: http://www.clubbz.com/club/2895/lowestoft/lowestoft_and_great_yarmouth_regional_astronomers_(lyra)

Monday, 22 December 2014

Charts-info Astrosite Groningen (December 20, 2014)

We have prepared the following new charts for our homepage:

C/2014 Q2 (Lovejoy):

- two 15x20 degrees charts for the period 22 December 2014 - 6 January 2015

These new charts are now available in the charts section of our
mainpage at: http://www.shopplaza.nl/astro


Reinder Bouma/Edwin van Dijk
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
----------------------------------------------------------------------------

--
Good Clear Skies
--
Astrocomet
--
Colin James Watling
--
Various Voluntary work-Litter Picking for Parish Council (Daytime) and
also a friend of Kessingland Beach (Watchman)
--
Profile: http://www.google.com/profiles/astrocomera
--
Real Astronomer and head of the Comet section for LYRA (Lowestoft and
Great Yarmouth Regional Astronomers) also head of K.A.G (Kessingland
Astronomy Group) and Navigator (Astrogator) of the Stars (Fieldwork)
--
Lyra Main Website: http://www.lyra-astro.co.uk/
--
Info: http://www.clubbz.com/club/2895/lowestoft/lowestoft_and_great_yarmouth_regional_astronomers_(lyra)

Saturday, 20 December 2014

Thursday, 18 December 2014

The Christmas Comet

Ephemeris for C/2014 Q2 Lovejoy

Omega= 12.3870 OMEGA= 94.9855 i= 80.3025 q= 1.290622 a=586.113533
e=0.997798 P=14189.681 T= 2015 January 30.0871 Equinox= 2000
Magnitudes calculated from m= 3.7+5.0*Log(d)+17.7*Log(r)+0.000*Beta

Station: UK
Latitude: 53.000 Longitude: 0.000 Magnetic variation: 0.0
Observing constraints: Sun below -13. deg Object above***** deg

December 2014 Positions for 00:00 ET, Times in UT

Elong Moon Comet
Day R.A. B1950 Dec R.A. J2000 Dec Mag D R Trans
Observable Sun Moon Phase Tail pA d RA dDec

1/ 2 7 33.5 -43.58 7 35.0 -44.04 7.2 1.03 1.56 2.52
Not Observable 102 102 78 34 317 -10 2
2/ 3 7 30.9 -43.50 7 32.5 -43.57 7.1 1.00 1.55 2.46
Not Observable 103 95 87 36 319 -11 3
3/ 4 7 28.2 -43.41 7 29.8 -43.48 7.0 0.98 1.54 2.39
Not Observable 103 87 93 37 320 -12 3
4/ 5 7 25.4 -43.31 7 26.9 -43.37 6.9 0.96 1.54 2.33
Not Observable 104 80 98 39 322 -12 4
5/ 6 7 22.4 -43.20 7 23.9 -43.26 6.8 0.94 1.53 2.26
Not Observable 105 73 100 41 323 -13 4
6/ 7 7 19.2 -43.07 7 20.8 -43.13 6.7 0.92 1.52 2.19
Not Observable 106 67 100 43 325 -14 5
7/ 8 7 15.9 -42.53 7 17.5 -42.58 6.7 0.90 1.51 2.11
Not Observable 107 63 98 45 327 -15 6
8/ 9 7 12.4 -42.36 7 14.0 -42.42 6.6 0.88 1.51 2.04
Not Observable 108 60 94 47 328 -16 6
9/10 7 8.7 -42.18 7 10.3 -42.23 6.5 0.86 1.50 1.56
Not Observable 109 59 88 49 330 -16 7
10/11 7 4.8 -41.58 7 6.4 -42.03 6.4 0.84 1.49 1.48
Not Observable 110 60 81 52 332 -17 8
11/12 7 0.8 -41.35 7 2.4 -41.40 6.3 0.82 1.48 1.40
Not Observable 111 63 73 54 334 -18 9
12/13 6 56.6 -41.10 6 58.2 -41.15 6.2 0.80 1.48 1.32
Not Observable 112 67 65 56 336 -19 10
13/14 6 52.2 -40.43 6 53.8 -40.47 6.1 0.78 1.47 1.24
Not Observable 113 72 55 59 338 -20 11
14/15 6 47.5 -40.12 6 49.2 -40.16 6.0 0.76 1.46 1.15
Not Observable 114 79 46 61 340 -22 12
15/16 6 42.7 -39.38 6 44.4 -39.41 5.9 0.74 1.46 1.07
Not Observable 115 86 36 64 342 -23 14
16/17 6 37.7 -39.01 6 39.4 -39.04 5.8 0.72 1.45 0.58
Not Observable 116 93 27 67 344 -24 15
17/18 6 32.5 -38.20 6 34.2 -38.22 5.7 0.70 1.44 0.49
Not Observable 117 101 18 70 347 -25 17
18/19 6 27.1 -37.34 6 28.8 -37.36 5.6 0.68 1.44 0.39
Not Observable 118 109 11 72 349 -26 18
19/20 6 21.5 -36.45 6 23.2 -36.46 5.6 0.66 1.43 0.30
Not Observable 119 117 5 75 351 -28 20
20/21 6 15.7 -35.50 6 17.4 -35.52 5.5 0.64 1.42 0.20
Not Observable 120 123 1 78 354 -29 22
21/22 6 9.7 -34.51 6 11.5 -34.52 5.4 0.63 1.42 0.10
Not Observable 122 126 0 81 357 -30 24
22/23 6 3.5 -33.46 6 5.4 -33.46 5.3 0.61 1.41 0.00
Not Observable 123 127 1 84 359 -31 27
23/24 5 57.2 -32.35 5 59.1 -32.35 5.2 0.60 1.41 23.50
Not Observable 124 124 5 87 3 -33 29
24/25 5 50.7 -31.19 5 52.6 -31.18 5.1 0.58 1.40 23.39
22.45 to 0.34 125 117 11 90 6 -34 31
25/26 5 44.1 -29.56 5 46.0 -29.54 5.0 0.57 1.39 23.29
21.58 to 0.60 126 109 20 93 9 -35 34
26/27 5 37.4 -28.26 5 39.3 -28.24 4.9 0.55 1.39 23.18
21.21 to 1.16 127 98 30 96 12 -37 37
27/28 5 30.5 -26.50 5 32.5 -26.48 4.8 0.54 1.38 23.08
20.47 to 1.28 128 87 41 99 16 -38 40
28/29 5 23.5 -25.06 5 25.6 -25.04 4.8 0.53 1.38 22.57
20.16 to 1.37 129 76 53 102 19 -39 43
29/30 5 16.5 -23.16 5 18.5 -23.13 4.7 0.52 1.37 22.46
19.46 to 1.45 130 64 64 105 23 -40 45
30/31 5 9.3 -21.19 5 11.5 -21.16 4.6 0.51 1.37 22.35
19.17 to 1.52 131 53 74 108 27 -41 48
31/32 5 2.2 -19.16 5 4.4 -19.12 4.6 0.50 1.36 22.24
18.49 to 1.58 131 43 83 111 31 -42 51


--
Good Clear Skies
--
Astrocomet
--
Colin James Watling
--
Various Voluntary work-Litter Picking for Parish Council (Daytime) and
also a friend of Kessingland Beach (Watchman)
--
Profile: http://www.google.com/profiles/astrocomera
--
Real Astronomer and head of the Comet section for LYRA (Lowestoft and
Great Yarmouth Regional Astronomers) also head of K.A.G (Kessingland
Astronomy Group) and Navigator (Astrogator) of the Stars (Fieldwork)
--
Lyra Main Website: http://www.lyra-astro.co.uk/
--
Info: http://www.clubbz.com/club/2895/lowestoft/lowestoft_and_great_yarmouth_regional_astronomers_(lyra)

Wednesday, 17 December 2014

[BAA-ebulletin 00829] A Christmas Comet

======================================================================
BAA electronic bulletin
======================================================================

A comet discovered from Australia by Terry Lovejoy on August 16 has
brightened quite rapidly. 2014 Q2 (Lovejoy) is currently too far
south to be seen from the UK, although it is being imaged with remote
telescopes. See for example the image by Damian Peach at
http://www.damianpeach.com/deepsky/c2014_q2_2014_12_14dp.jpg with
other images in the Section archive at
http://www.britastro.org/cometobs/2014q2/index.html The comet is
heading northwards and might be seen from the UK in about a week's
time, but it will be very low down in the south so you will need an
unobstructed horizon. By Christmas it will be easier to see, but
still low down and highest around midnight. The comet should be at
its brightest at around 4th to 5th magnitude in the first half of
January when it will be conveniently visible in the evening sky.
There are finder charts on the Computing Section web page at
http://britastro.org/computing/charts_comet.html

The comet is unlikely to show much of a tail, but one of a degree or
so in length might be seen with binoculars. It will probably show
quite a large diffuse coma, with a stronger central condensation. You
will need dark skies to see it to best effect, but it will be
sufficiently bright that even city dwellers should be able to find it
in binoculars when it is higher in the sky in January. Interesting
imaging opportunities include the early hours of December 29 when the
comet is very close to M79, mid January when it is relatively close to
the Pleiades and February 2 when it transects the line between M34 and
NGC752. Please send any images to Denis Buczynski at
cometobs@britastro.org

Simple instructions on comet observation are in the BAA Observing
Guide - see http://britastro.org/product/1198 Please send visual
observations to me, if possible in standard ICQ format. The more
comprehensive Section Observing Guide to Comets is currently out of
print, however a pdf version of the draft new edition will be
available in the Members area of the BAA web site in the near future.
The Section web page at http://www.ast.cam.ac.uk/~jds/ is regularly
updated and will have all the latest information on the comet.

Clear skies and a happy Christmas observing the comet!

Jonathan Shanklin
Director

======================================================================
BAA-ebulletin mailing list visit:
http://lists.britastro.org/mailman/listinfo/baa-ebulletin
(c) 2014 British Astronomical Association http://www.britastro.org/
======================================================================


--
Good Clear Skies
--
Astrocomet
--
Colin James Watling
--
Various Voluntary work-Litter Picking for Parish Council (Daytime) and
also a friend of Kessingland Beach (Watchman)
--
Profile: http://www.google.com/profiles/astrocomera
--
Real Astronomer and head of the Comet section for LYRA (Lowestoft and
Great Yarmouth Regional Astronomers) also head of K.A.G (Kessingland
Astronomy Group) and Navigator (Astrogator) of the Stars (Fieldwork)
--
Lyra Main Website: http://www.lyra-astro.co.uk/
--
Info: http://www.clubbz.com/club/2895/lowestoft/lowestoft_and_great_yarmouth_regional_astronomers_(lyra)

Sunday, 14 December 2014

Binocular Comet Lovejoy Heading To The Inner Solar System

http://www.skyandtelescope.com/astronomy-news/observing-news/binocular-comet-lovejoy-heading-c2014-q2-lovejoy-1211142/?et_mid=709591&rid=246895886

--
Good Clear Skies
--
Astrocomet
--
Colin James Watling
--
Various Voluntary work-Litter Picking for Parish Council (Daytime) and
also a friend of Kessingland Beach (Watchman)
--
Profile: http://www.google.com/profiles/astrocomera
--
Real Astronomer and head of the Comet section for LYRA (Lowestoft and
Great Yarmouth Regional Astronomers) also head of K.A.G (Kessingland
Astronomy Group) and Navigator (Astrogator) of the Stars (Fieldwork)
--
Lyra Main Website: http://www.lyra-astro.co.uk/
--
Info: http://www.clubbz.com/club/2895/lowestoft/lowestoft_and_great_yarmouth_regional_astronomers_(lyra)

Weekend meteor shower

Space Weather News for Dec. 12, 2014
http://spaceweather.com

GEMINID METEOR SHOWER: The best meteor shower of the year, the
Geminids, peaks this weekend when Earth passes through a stream of
debris from "rock comet" 3200 Phaethon. Forecasters expect to see as
many as 120 meteors per hour when the shower peaks on Dec. 13th and
14th. Visit http://spaceweather.com for photos and observing tips.

AURORA WATCH: A geomagnetic storm is underway on Dec. 12th as Earth
enters a high-speed stream of solar wind. Aurora alerts are available
from http://spaceweathertext.com (text) and
http://spaceweatherphone.com (voice).

--
Good Clear Skies
--
Astrocomet
--
Colin James Watling
--
Various Voluntary work-Litter Picking for Parish Council (Daytime) and
also a friend of Kessingland Beach (Watchman)
--
Profile: http://www.google.com/profiles/astrocomera
--
Real Astronomer and head of the Comet section for LYRA (Lowestoft and
Great Yarmouth Regional Astronomers) also head of K.A.G (Kessingland
Astronomy Group) and Navigator (Astrogator) of the Stars (Fieldwork)
--
Lyra Main Website: http://www.lyra-astro.co.uk/
--
Info: http://www.clubbz.com/club/2895/lowestoft/lowestoft_and_great_yarmouth_regional_astronomers_(lyra)

[BAA-ebulletin 00828] Live observations of Geminid meteors on the BAA website

======================================================================
BAA electronic bulletin
======================================================================
This weekend will be the highlight of the meteor observing year, with
the Geminid meteor shower reaching its peak in the early hours of
Sunday morning. You can find details of how to observe the shower in
the eBulletin that John Mason circulated yesterday.

To help as many people as possible to see the meteors, we are also
running an online observing event on the BAA website, which you can
find here: <http://britastro.org/2014geminids>. We are posting images
recorded by two upward-pointing CCTV cameras operated by Nick James in
Chelmsford.

Nick's cameras automatically take images whenever they detect movement
in the sky, and the images are posted to the BAA website almost
immediately. In the past couple of nights, they have already recorded
more than a dozen meteors, and we hope they will record many more over
the weekend.

The automated nature of these cameras means that in addition to
meteors, they also detect many planes, birds, clouds, especially in
the early evening. If you have an account on the BAA website (which
you can set up by visiting <http://www.britastro.org/user/register>),
you can submit votes for which images you think are of genuine
meteors, and which you think bogus. You can also see what other users
think.

This is, of course, no substitute for going out, doing your own meteor
watches and submitting your results to the Meteor Section. See
<http://britastro.org/article_render/5885> for more information about
how to do that. However, our online event will hopefully prove a fun
way for you to see some of the very fine images being produced by
video cameras operated by Meteor Section members in the NEMETODE
network.

Clear skies!

Dominic.

-----
Dr Dominic Ford
BAA Website Manager
======================================================================
BAA-ebulletin mailing list visit:
http://lists.britastro.org/mailman/listinfo/baa-ebulletin
(c) 2014 British Astronomical Association http://www.britastro.org/
======================================================================

--
Good Clear Skies
--
Astrocomet
--
Colin James Watling
--
Various Voluntary work-Litter Picking for Parish Council (Daytime) and
also a friend of Kessingland Beach (Watchman)
--
Profile: http://www.google.com/profiles/astrocomera
--
Real Astronomer and head of the Comet section for LYRA (Lowestoft and
Great Yarmouth Regional Astronomers) also head of K.A.G (Kessingland
Astronomy Group) and Navigator (Astrogator) of the Stars (Fieldwork)
--
Lyra Main Website: http://www.lyra-astro.co.uk/
--
Info: http://www.clubbz.com/club/2895/lowestoft/lowestoft_and_great_yarmouth_regional_astronomers_(lyra)

Friday, 12 December 2014

[BAA-ebulletin 00827] GEMINID METEOR SHOWER UNDERWAY

======================================================================
BAA electronic bulletin
======================================================================

GEMINID METEOR SHOWER UNDERWAY

The Geminid meteor shower is now underway, with peak activity expected
throughout the coming weekend..

The Geminids are the richest of the annual meteor showers, with rates
outstripping those of the Perseids for a 24-hour interval centred on their
14 December maximum. The peak this year coincides with a last quarter Moon
in Virgo, so there should be comparatively little interference by moonlight
even during the early morning hours. The highest observed rates are most
likely during the night of December 13/14, particularly in the pre-dawn
hours of Sunday, December 14, and conveniently during a weekend.

This year, Geminid maximum is expected at around 07h on Sunday, 14th
December, when the peak Geminid Zenithal Hourly Rate may reach 120 m/h.
There is the added bonus of an increased proportional abundance of bright
events after maximum; past observations show that bright Geminids become
more numerous some hours after the rates have peaked, a consequence of
particle-sorting in the meteor stream.

The Geminid maximum is quite broad so it is important to have a spread of
observers making observations throughout the nights of 12th/13th, 13th/14th
and on 14th/15th December to ensure adequate coverage of the shower maximum.
In addition, observations by BAA members in North America and the Far East
will be welcomed by the Meteor Section to improve coverage of the period of
peak shower activity.

The Geminid radiant (at RA 07h 32m Dec +33o, just north of Castor) rises
early in the evening and reaches a respectable altitude well before
midnight, so observers who are unable to stay up late can still contribute
useful watches.

Meteor showers are supposed to come from periodic comets, yet there is no
very short period comet that matches the orbit of the Geminid meteoroid
stream. Instead, the orbit of the Geminids is occupied by an object called
3200 Phaethon, which looks remarkably like a rocky asteroid. A group of
astronomers led by David Jewitt of UCLA have been using NASA's STEREO probes
to take a closer look at 3200 Phaethon when it passes closest to the Sun. In
2010 one of the STEREO probes recorded a doubling of Phaethon's brightness
as it approached the Sun, as if sunlight were shining through a cloud of
dust around the asteroid.

The observers began to suspect 3200 Phaethon was something new - a "rock
comet" which is, essentially, an asteroid that approaches so close to the
Sun that solar heating scorches dusty debris right off its rocky surface
forming a tail of rocky grains. Seeing 3200 Phaethon sprout a tail, even a
small one, provides some confidence that Phaethon is indeed the source of
the Geminids - but a mystery remains: How can such a stubby protuberance
produce such a grand meteor shower? Only time and further continued
observations may provide the answer.

Geminid meteors enter the atmosphere at a relatively slow 35 km/sec, and
thanks to their robust (rocky/asteroidal as opposed to dusty/cometary)
nature tend to last longer than most in luminous flight. Unlike swift
Perseid or Orionid meteors, which last only a few tenths of a second,
Geminids may be visible for a second or longer, sometimes appearing to
fragment into a train of 'blobs'. Their relatively low speed and the
abundance of bright events makes the Geminids a prime target for imaging.

For further information, or copies of report forms, observing notes, and
details of how to carry out group meteor watches, please visit the BAA
Meteor Section website at http://britastro.org/meteor

This e-bulletin issued by:

John W. Mason, Director, BAA Meteor Section

2014 December 10


======================================================================
BAA-ebulletin mailing list visit:
http://lists.britastro.org/mailman/listinfo/baa-ebulletin
(c) 2014 British Astronomical Association http://www.britastro.org/
======================================================================


--
Good Clear Skies
--
Astrocomet
--
Colin James Watling
--
Various Voluntary work-Litter Picking for Parish Council (Daytime) and
also a friend of Kessingland Beach (Watchman)
--
Real Astronomer and head of the Comet section for LYRA (Lowestoft and
Great Yarmouth Regional Astronomers) also head of K.A.G (Kessingland
Astronomy Group) and Navigator (Astrogator) of the Stars (Fieldwork)
--
Lyra Main Website: http://www.lyra-astro.co.uk/
--
Info: http://www.clubbz.com/club/2895/lowestoft/lowestoft_and_great_yarmouth_regional_astronomers_(lyra)

Wednesday, 10 December 2014

Lyra and Kag Skywatch

WHERE AND WHEN:

Saturday night at Kessingland Beach and Sailors Home Pub-meet at the
Beach sea wall at 19.00 for Skywatch and the pub later for a buffet
and talk.

All invited-clear skies and weather permitting.

Facebook page: https://www.facebook.com/events/1592042251017077/?context=create&previousaction=create&source=49&sid_create=3810721024

The Weather for Saturday night in Kessingland: https://www.metcheck.com/UK/dayforecast.asp?zipcode=Kessingland&day=3&locationID=63157&lat=52.4&lon=1.7&findtype=

--
Good Clear Skies
--
Astrocomet
--
Colin James Watling
--
Various Voluntary work-Litter Picking for Parish Council (Daytime) and
also a friend of Kessingland Beach (Watchman)
--
Profile: http://www.google.com/profiles/astrocomera
--
Real Astronomer and head of the Comet section for LYRA (Lowestoft and
Great Yarmouth Regional Astronomers) also head of K.A.G (Kessingland
Astronomy Group) and Navigator (Astrogator) of the Stars (Fieldwork)
--
Lyra Main Website: http://www.lyra-astro.co.uk/
--
Info: http://www.clubbz.com/club/2895/lowestoft/lowestoft_and_great_yarmouth_regional_astronomers_(lyra)

Monday, 8 December 2014

Study: Astronauts face a growing peril from space radiation

Space Weather News for Dec. 6, 2014
http://spaceweather.com

SPACE RADIATION: According to a new study just published in the
research journal Space Weather, astronauts face a growing peril from
space radiation. Rising fluxes of cosmic rays inside the solar system
place increasingly strict limits on the amount of time explorers can
safely travel through interplanetary space. Visit
http://spaceweather.com for more information and links to the complete
study.

AURORA WATCH: Arctic sky watchers should be alert for auroras this
weekend. Earth is passing through a fast-moving stream of solar wind,
and this is causing geomagnetic unrest around the poles. Geomagnetic
storm alerts are available from http://spaceweathertext.com (text) and
http://spaceweatherphone.com (voice).

--
Good Clear Skies
--
Astrocomet
--
Colin James Watling
--
Various Voluntary work-Litter Picking for Parish Council (Daytime) and
also a friend of Kessingland Beach (Watchman)
--
Profile: http://www.google.com/profiles/astrocomera
--
Real Astronomer and head of the Comet section for LYRA (Lowestoft and
Great Yarmouth Regional Astronomers) also head of K.A.G (Kessingland
Astronomy Group) and Navigator (Astrogator) of the Stars (Fieldwork)
--
Lyra Main Website: http://www.lyra-astro.co.uk/
--
Info: http://www.clubbz.com/club/2895/lowestoft/lowestoft_and_great_yarmouth_regional_astronomers_(lyra)

Charts-info Astrosite Groningen (December 6, 2014)

Dear comet observers,

We have prepared the following new charts for our homepage:

C/2012 K1 (PANSTARRS):

- a 4.5x6.0 degrees chart for the period 8 - 16 December 2014

C/2014 Q2 (Lovejoy):

- a 9x12 degrees chart for the period 10 - 22 December 2014


These new charts are now available in the charts section of our
mainpage at: http://www.shopplaza.nl/astro

Reinder Bouma/Edwin van Dijk
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
----------------------------------------------------------------------------

--
Good Clear Skies
--
Astrocomet
--
Colin James Watling
--
Various Voluntary work-Litter Picking for Parish Council (Daytime) and
also a friend of Kessingland Beach (Watchman)
--
Profile: http://www.google.com/profiles/astrocomera
--
Real Astronomer and head of the Comet section for LYRA (Lowestoft and
Great Yarmouth Regional Astronomers) also head of K.A.G (Kessingland
Astronomy Group) and Navigator (Astrogator) of the Stars (Fieldwork)
--
Lyra Main Website: http://www.lyra-astro.co.uk/
--
Info: http://www.clubbz.com/club/2895/lowestoft/lowestoft_and_great_yarmouth_regional_astronomers_(lyra)

Tuesday, 2 December 2014

Geminid meteor shower gets an early start

Space Weather News for Dec. 1, 2014
http://spaceweather.com

EARLY GEMINIDS: Earth is entering a stream of debris from "rock comet"
3200 Phaethon, source of the annual Geminid meteor shower. The shower
is not expected to peak until Dec. 14th, but NASA meteor cameras are
detecting Geminid fireballs over the USA two weeks early. Visit
http://spaceweather.com for images and updates.

AURORA WATCH: A high-speed solar wind stream is buffeting Earth's
magnetic field on Dec. 1-2. High-latitude sky watchers, especially
those around the Arctic Circle, should be alert for auroras in the
nights ahead. Geomagnetic storm alerts are available from
http://spaceweathertext.com (text) and http://spaceweatherphone.com
(voice).


--
Good Clear Skies
--
Astrocomet
--
Colin James Watling
--
Various Voluntary work-Litter Picking for Parish Council (Daytime) and
also a friend of Kessingland Beach (Watchman)
--
Profile: http://www.google.com/profiles/astrocomera
--
Real Astronomer and head of the Comet section for LYRA (Lowestoft and
Great Yarmouth Regional Astronomers) also head of K.A.G (Kessingland
Astronomy Group) and Navigator (Astrogator) of the Stars (Fieldwork)
--
Lyra Main Website: http://www.lyra-astro.co.uk/
--
Info: http://www.clubbz.com/club/2895/lowestoft/lowestoft_and_great_yarmouth_regional_astronomers_(lyra)

[BAA-ebulletin 00826] Reminder for the next BAA meeting on 13th December

======================================================================
BAA electronic bulletin
======================================================================

I would like to remind you that the next meeting of the BAA will be on
Saturday 13th December in the University College London Christopher Ingold
Building. 20 Gordon Street, London, WC1H 0AJ.

This meeting is now heavily booked and we expect to have a waiting list.

The early booking offer for members closed on November 25th, but there are
still a few places left for which there will be a £5.00 charge (BAA members
and non members alike) - please contact the office immediately if you would
like to reserve a place.

Do let us know straight away if you have already booked, but will not now
be able to come, so that we can give your place to someone else.

Because we have so many people coming we will split the registration into
alpha sets so please go to the table appropriate to your surname to help
ease any overcrowding.

The programme for the afternoon is: -

14:30 - Welcome by the BAA President Mrs Hazel McGee, notices and Ordinary
Meeting. Presentation of the Sir Patrick Moore Prize
14:45 - Christmas Lecture - Lord Rees, The BAA Christmas Lecture: "The next
25 years in astronomy -- some hopes and speculations"
15:45 - Tea
16:15 - Prof Mike Barlow UCL - `Supernovae, red giant stars and the dust
content of galaxies at high and low redshifts.'
17:15 - Sky Notes - Nick James
17:45 - close

Doors open at *13:45* and the meeting will start at 14:30 and is due to
finish by 17:30. Tea will be served mid afternoon at 15:45. Please note
there will not be any tea before the meeting.

We will also have the BAA Sales Stand and Astronomia coming for you to
visit as it is an ideal time to buy those stocking fillers for Christmas.

Hazel Collett
Meetings Secretary
======================================================================
BAA-ebulletin mailing list visit:
http://lists.britastro.org/mailman/listinfo/baa-ebulletin
(c) 2014 British Astronomical Association http://www.britastro.org/
======================================================================


--
Good Clear Skies
--
Astrocomet
--
Colin James Watling
--
Various Voluntary work-Litter Picking for Parish Council (Daytime) and
also a friend of Kessingland Beach (Watchman)
--
Profile: http://www.google.com/profiles/astrocomera
--
Real Astronomer and head of the Comet section for LYRA (Lowestoft and
Great Yarmouth Regional Astronomers) also head of K.A.G (Kessingland
Astronomy Group) and Navigator (Astrogator) of the Stars (Fieldwork)
--
Lyra Main Website: http://www.lyra-astro.co.uk/
--
Info: http://www.clubbz.com/club/2895/lowestoft/lowestoft_and_great_yarmouth_regional_astronomers_(lyra)